Book Review: If You Are Over Fifty, You Are Entitled To Some Very Interesting Discounts On Travel:


Title: Unbelievably Good Deals and Great Adventures That You Absolutely Can't Get Unless You're Over 50 (2005-2006
Author: Joan Rattner Heilman
ISBN: 0071438297
Publishers: McGraw-Hill:

The following review was contributed by: NORM GOLDMAN: Editor of Bookpleasures.

REVIEW

No age group represents such an enormous market of potential consumers than those over the age of fifty.

According to author Joan Rather Heilman, author of Unbelievably Good Deals and Great Adventures That You Absolutely Can't Get Unless You're Over 50 (2005-2006), more than a quarter of the population of the United States is over 50, and by the 2020 it is expected to reach one third.

It is little wonder why the business community actively courts this sector of the population that controls most of the wealth of the USA.

If you are one of the lucky ones who have reached the "big five O," hold onto your wallets before you fork out money for hotels, car rentals, tour packages, college courses, airfare, entrance admission to parks, restaurants, buses, trains, sports activities, and even shopping.

Heilman passes out all kinds of "goodies," as if we are children in a candy shop, with hundreds of tips as to how to stretch your vacation dollars.

Dividing the book into twenty chapters, the author presents excellent insights pertaining to various value-added possibilities. However, as stated by the author, it is essential that if you are over fifty, you must very often ask for these discounts. Most vendors and their representatives will not voluntarily offer them to you.

Most of the book is devoted to savings the over fifty crowd can enjoy from the travel industry. Realizing that this sector of the population is the most ardent travelers, it is only logical that the travel industry would offer all kinds of price reductions.

Heilman details the offerings of the various airlines with their names, phone numbers and web sites. Similarly, discounts pertaining to hotels, motels, car rental companies are listed.

Are you looking for some alternative lodging? Did you know that Del Webb Sun Cities, the largest builder of active communities offers a Vacation Getaway program, where you can enjoy low-cost, short vacation stays so that you can sample the lifestyle to see whether you would like to move in? Bear in mind, however, that in order to qualify one partner in a visiting couple must be over the age of 55.

In addition, the reader will discover all kinds of deals concerning trains, buses and boats pertaining to North America and elsewhere. Companies such as Amtrak, Via Rail in Canada, Greyhound Lines, train passes in Britain, France and other European countries offer some kind of a discounts, although requirements as to age may differ.

If you are a sport's enthusiast, Heilman presents a comprehensive rundown of assorted clubs, tours, associations, and other institutions that offer different vacation possibilities as skiing, cycling, walking, golfing, even softball, where special privileges and discounts are offered. Names, phone numbers, and website addresses are included.

In addition to being a nifty addition to one's library, this reader friendly book would make a great birthday gift for anyone celebrating his or her "big five O."
________________________________________________________________

Norm Goldman is Editor of the book reviewing site, www.bookpleasures.com">http://www.bookpleasures.com and the travel site, www.sketchandtravel.com">http://www.sketchandtravel.com.

Norm is also a regular contributor to many other book reviewing sites including Amazon.com.

Norm and his artist wife, Lily, are a unique husband and wife team in that they meld words with art focusing on romantic and wedding destinations.

You can view more of Norm's book reviews on www.bookpleasures.com">http://www.bookpleasures.com and his travel articles and Lily's art work at www.sketchandtravel.com">http://www.sketchandtravel.com


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