Entrepreneurs Reach Record Income Levels Using New EBook on Adsense and Adword Techniques


The "Rich Jerk" has created quite a stir on the Internet about his new ebook revealing secrets on how to use use Google Adwords and Adsense for big profits. He has recently sold a website on eBay for $390,000 that had a $900,000 annual return. It only took him nine months to reach that sky-rocketing figure.

The Rich Jerk's real name is Kelly Summer. He often likes to refer to himself as "The Rich Jerk" for his attention grabbing and rude awakening marketing techniques. He has recently grabbed notoriety amongst some of the leading marketing experts such as Lance Groom, Jeff Mills, Dean Marino, Britt Phillips, and Karl Payne. Some people are saying that this revealing ebook has opened many doors for new and experienced marketers to make a lot of online money.

The Rich Jerk has been able to earn over $13 million in the past six years with clickbank and Paypal using these exact same techniques he now teaches. Some critics say that The Rich Jerk has revealed too much information and that could shrink their pocket books by the competition of new marketing arrivals.

This book is also not for the faint of heart. It contains some marketing tactics that are considered "grey hat" and "black hat." It also assumes readers are professional enough to understand investing in their business, in the form of advertising. Not every tactic is grey hat, black hat, or costs money though - there's a nice mix of many different tactics and approaches. The book is a "no fluff" and "no filler" type ebook that gets right to the point and shows you exactly how this guy is making tons of cash.

The Rich Jerk is a legitimate online player. People are also stating that they just couldn't resist The Rich Jerk and what he had to say in his brand new ebook. Ninety-nine percent of the reviews online have stated, "don't worry at all about feeling like you got duped, because The Rich Jerk is not such a jerk after all and his book was downright Awesome"! Yes he does have an abrasive advertising style, but what the Jerk does do is make a lot of money, and is now willing to teach other people how to do the same.

In the first chapter, entitled "Creating an Affiliate Website that Sells Like Crazy", he covers building affiliate websites to earn commissions from the sales of other people's products. He starts by listing 13 affiliate sites and ranks them as "must join", "maybe join", and "join if you are bored". Once you've selected a product to sell, he goes through six specific writing strategies to use on your affiliate site to hook the reader and get them to click through on your affiliate link. He then gives you a complete sample "sales letter" (it's more like an article) with all of his strategies at work.

The third section in chapter one discusses offering rebates to your customers, but it's not just the same old "buy from me and I'll give you part of my affiliate fee back". The Rich Jerk delves into specific ways to do refunds that will increase your bottom line as opposed to simply offering a rebate.

In the final section of chapter one, The Rich Jerk writes about setting up pay-per-lead sites, where you get paid $10 or so for each person who provides you with his or her information (which you then pass on to a company which pays you for the lead). This is a technique that has not been explored in-depth much by any of the mainstream Internet marketing channels.

So why is "The Rich Jerk" much better than you? The answer to this question lies within his newly released ebook.

For more information on "The Rich Jerk" Go To... www.RichLackey.com">http://www.RichLackey.com

See some of his actual sales below: www.magazinemillions.com/sales.html">http://www.magazinemillions.com/sales.html

My name is Lance Groom and I am formally from the Hit TV Show "Making Money", also past board member for "Susan Powter" health fitness, and Infomercial guru. In 2001 I led one of the largest advertising campaigns in over 6,000 newspapers. This campaign resulted in over 25,000 sales all over the world creating "Classified Millions".


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