Stewie Griffin Depicts the Winter of Spenglers Discontent


Oswald Spengler predicted a protracted winter in The Decline of The West. Spengler wasn't alone in his depiction of a distopian society where fashion reigns over utility, luck is dominant, bureaucracy squelches progress and the rich have a firm hold on the reigns of an incipient global culture. Spengler was one of the first to be taken seriously.

Stewie's Guide to WORLD DOMINATION [sic] is a ray of sunshine for a winter day of our decline. In Spengler's seasonal taxonomy of decline, winter is the final phase. Spengler writes that one cue of a culture in winter is an increasingly authoritative government. In an authoritarian government, clearly stating your perception is not a fiscally sustainable option.

"?if I were to confess to knowing that the entire enterprise is a sham, then that delicious stream of cold, hard cash that appears under my pillow following the loss of a tooth gets suddenly cut off, doesn't it?" --Stewie Griffin Transcribed by Steve Callaghan

Spengler separates culture from civilization. Yes, the two are intertwined, but culture reflects the people while civilization reflects the aspirations of global domination, requiring increasingly authoritarian leaders who represent power rather than being powerful on their own. A culture of war masks itself in fashion and subverts education into specialized academic philosophy with obvious discrepancies from reality.

Stewie calls out that the basis of American education, the three Rs doesn't represent three Rs: Reading, wRiting and aRithmetic. Stewie suggests that we might be better served by the acronym W.A.R.

"There's no country that likes 'W.A.R. more than our own?blame the Boss Hoggs of the world who got the whole enterprise off on the wrong foot with this 'thre Rs' nonsense." --Stewie Griffin

Spengler predicted a focus on lavish sport entertainment as the final cues of the closing of culture and the domination of civilization, where work looses meaning for the affluent as sports becomes the substitute for meaning in one's life. Stewie deftly reveals both of these cues at once as he discusses a typical civilization workplace.

"you are rotting your brain?find yourself having to alternately ask and then answer the terribly probing and provocative question, 'Did you have a nice weekend?' forty-seven different times. And let's face it: Despite the fact that most of the replies should fall along the lines of, 'Well, I spent most of Saturday and Sunday trying to ignore the loveless marriage and spoiled brats I've surrounded myself with while being tranquilized by the narcotic of back-to-back-to-back NFL football in order to keep myself from pondering the very real possibility that I might be gay.'" --Stewie Griffin

Stewie is a ray of light, warming our winter day. Spengler holds that winter is devoid of symbolic art. In a civilization's winter art is replaced by a meaningless fashion dialogue. Stewie staves off the meaninglessness of our encroaching civilization by disseminating symbolic art about our civilization in Stewie's Guide to WORLD DOMINATION, Helped into print by Steve Callaghan; Perennial Currents, 2006.

Howard Campbell is host of the Poker Without Cards coversation at www.intellishit.com">http://www.intellishit.com


MORE RESOURCES:
'The two things I love most are novels and birds, and they're both in trouble,' says The Corrections author, one of the world's most famous birdwatchers, in an extensive interview in The Guardian

With less than 10 days to go until Thanksgiving and the start of the holiday shopping season, independent bookstores around the country are finalizing their plans for the sixth annual Indies First celebration. Held every year on Small Business Saturday, the day after Black Friday, Indies First has grown to include more than 500 indie bookstores around the country.

Amazon confirmed Tuesday morning that it has chosen sites in New York City and Northern Virginia as the locations for its new headquarters. As previously reported, the New York City office will be located in the Long Island City neighborhood in Queens. The Northern Virginia site will be in the National Landing section of Arlington, about five miles away from Crystal City, which previously had been reported as the Amazon choice in the metro Washington, D.C., area.

Stan Lee, who as chief writer and editor of Marvel Comics helped create some of the most enduring superheroes of the 20th century and was a major force behind the breakout successes of the comic-book industry in the 1960s and early '70s, died on Monday in Los Angeles. He was 95.

A worldwide strike by antiquarian booksellers against an Amazon subsidiary proved successful after two days, with the retailer apologizing and saying it would cancel the actions that prompted the protest.

It was a rare concerted uprising against any part of Amazon by any of its millions of suppliers, leading to an even rarer capitulation. Even the book dealers said they were surprised at the sudden reversal by AbeBooks, the company's secondhand and rare bookselling network.

The uprising, which involved nearly 600 booksellers in 27 countries removing about four million books, was set off by the retailer's decision to cut off stores in five countries: the Czech Republic, Poland, Hungary, South Korea and Russia. AbeBooks never explained its actions beyond saying it was related to payment processing...

Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, a nationally influential literary critic for The New York Times for three decades, who wrote some 4,000 reviews and essays, mostly for the daily column Books of The Times, died on Wednesday in Manhattan. He was 84.

Jin Yong, a literary giant of the Chinese-speaking world whose fantastical epic novels inspired countless film, television and video game adaptations and were read by generations of ethnic Chinese, died on Oct. 30 in Hong Kong. He was 94.

... For those of us lucky enough to know Todd, it was not only the adorable, customizable structures of the libraries that made him happy but it was something far bigger: community. For Todd, Little Free Libraries were places that strengthened community ties where they existed and built ties where they were absent. And he loved how comments and challenges sparked new ideas and initiatives.

Not enough Little Free Libraries in high-needs communities? Todd created the Impact Library Grants Fund. Interested in ways to engage a community? Todd formed and encouraged the use of the Action Book Club. Looking for more positive interaction between youth and law enforcement? Todd's answer was to create the Kids, Community & Cops program. Looking to create better conversations around books? Pass out Whatcha Readin' buttons. ...

Beginning today and lasting a week, more than 300 booksellers around the world are not selling titles on AbeBooks, the Amazon subsidiary that specializes in collectible and used books, to protest AbeBooks' decision to ban booksellers from several nations, including South Korea, Hungary, the Czech Republic and Russia. The action is called Banned Booksellers Week and was begun, the New York Times said, by British bookseller Simon Beattie.

The plea went out a few weeks ago from October Books in the port city of Southampton, England: "Care to lend a hand?"

Volunteers were needed to help the store move to a new location about 500 feet down the road--a move made possible by a fundraising campaign that allowed the beloved local store to buy its new location for over half a million pounds (about $650,000) thus protecting it from future rent increases--which had forced it out of its former building.

This past Sunday, a human chain began forming from the old October Books stockroom, snaking past 54 doors to the new building. Hand-to-hand, the chain of people passed thousands of books over a few hours.

"It was very moving," Ms. Haynes said, adding that the employees were "all getting choked up" about how members of the community had leapt to help out.

thatware.org ©