The Isaiah Effect, by Greg Braden


Why do some prayers seem to be answered while others not? "The secret of prayer lies beyond the words of praise, the incantations, and the rhythmic chants to the `powers that be."

We are only using a small part of the "equation" of prayer and those elements that we are missing are emotion, thought, and feeling; it is these elements that when properly aligned are the formula for creation.

In the 4th century, the Nicean Council excluded twenty-two ancient writings from the Biblical canon because they either felt that they were redundant, or that the writings should be preserved for scholars or the mystery schools, thus the science of prayer has been lost to the Western world for 2500 years. The first part of the book discusses the various prophecies foretold by the North American Hopi, the Maya, Nostradamus, and Isaiah, as well as prophets like Edgar Cayce, who forecast devastation and upheaval of the earth in the days of the prophecies, which is Now. Braden sites several cases of miracles over the years that changed the course of events and may be the result of group prayer or mass consciousness. If the prophecies are fulfilled, we are on an inevitable path to destruction, and Braden feels we may be able to reverse this path if we use the science of prayer as a collective consciousness, to choose a different future.

Braden pulls together hard science, theories, and earth events, to support his viewpoint for the need for mass consciousness and prayer, and I feel that this book is singularly headed in one direction, that is the call for action to change the predetermined path that we are presently on.

It is thought that the imbalances imposed upon the earth are mirrored as conditions within our bodies like diseases such as cancer, and similarly the earthquakes and volcanic eruptions are mirrors of a great change in the human consciousness. Braden discusses the mirror theory of quantum physics and suggests that if alternate realities exist simultaneously, prayer is the secret key allowing us to choose the reality that we want to experience. It is our thought and feeling, every moment, which determines the reality that we experience, sometimes consciously and sometimes unconsciously.

This book reminds me of James Redfield's, The Celestine Prophecy, where much the same concept of mass consciousness and prayer was introduced in a fictional adventure.

To compliment Gregg Braden's research I would recommend reading You'll See It When You Believe It, Dr. Wayne Dyer.

Cindy DeJager is a writer and book reviewer for Rosetta Stone Press, publisher of The Many Waters, by Lauretta Lueck. www.RosettaStonePress.com">http://www.RosettaStonePress.com


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