The Bible Code II: The Countdown, by Michael Drosnin


Sir Isaac Newton knew about the Bible code 300 hundred years ago when he described it as "a cryptogram set by the Almighty?.The riddle of the God-head, the riddle of past and future events divinely fore-ordained."

Newton was captivated with the idea that the Torah could contain a code that could foretell future events, but until the invention of the computer the task of deciphering this code was almost impossible. But "The Bible code had a time-lock. It could not be opened until the computer was invented?The Bible code is like a giant jigsaw puzzle, and we have only a handful of the pieces."

Journalist and reporter formerly for the Washington Post, Michael Drosnin, and Dr. Eliyahu Rips, a famous Israeli mathematician, explain their search for the Code Key that will decipher the Bible code. Like the Rosetta stone found at the mouth of the Nile 200 years ago, perhaps the code key would unlock the language of all mankind. Rips describes the structure of the Torah as a three-dimensional cylinder that "you just lay flat like a map" to read it, and "by eliminating "...all the spaces between the words, and [restoring] the Bible to the original form...the way Moses received the Bible from God - contiguous, without break of words" he is able to decipher the code using a computer program that he wrote.

In a gripping personal testimony of his search for the truth, Drosnin awakes us to the possibility that our future is already written. But if it is already prophesied, can we change our future? Drosnin's mission is to warn us that the End of Days is upon us, and that the Bible code tells us that it will be in 2006. Only if we find the key to unlock the message that was hidden from us can we hope to change our destiny.

Two important concepts are presented in the book, first that world events we are witnessing are actually The End of Days as prophesied in the Bible; and second, that man's capacity for language was a gift to mankind from (God) the Lord of the code, and that our language gene came from an advanced race not of this Earth.

"The secret of the genetic code is revealed in Genesis, where God tells Abraham, 'I will bless thee greatly, and I will greatly multiply thy seed as the stars of Heaven, and as the sand that is upon the seashore; and in thy seed shall all the nations of the world be blessed."

That our DNA contains a gene that was sent to Earth in a vehicle from the cosmos, from an advanced race of men, is revealed in the code of the Torah and this theory is not new. About 25 years ago, Nobel laureate biologist Francis Crick published a theory called the Directed Panspermia.

This was a breath-taking read, and I highly recommend this book. Drosnin is objective and honest, and I like that.

Cindy DeJager is a writer and book reviewer for Rosetta Stone Press, publisher of The Many Waters, by Lauretta Lueck. www.RosettaStonePress.com">http://www.RosettaStonePress.com


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