The Bible Code II: The Countdown, by Michael Drosnin


Sir Isaac Newton knew about the Bible code 300 hundred years ago when he described it as "a cryptogram set by the Almighty?.The riddle of the God-head, the riddle of past and future events divinely fore-ordained."

Newton was captivated with the idea that the Torah could contain a code that could foretell future events, but until the invention of the computer the task of deciphering this code was almost impossible. But "The Bible code had a time-lock. It could not be opened until the computer was invented?The Bible code is like a giant jigsaw puzzle, and we have only a handful of the pieces."

Journalist and reporter formerly for the Washington Post, Michael Drosnin, and Dr. Eliyahu Rips, a famous Israeli mathematician, explain their search for the Code Key that will decipher the Bible code. Like the Rosetta stone found at the mouth of the Nile 200 years ago, perhaps the code key would unlock the language of all mankind. Rips describes the structure of the Torah as a three-dimensional cylinder that "you just lay flat like a map" to read it, and "by eliminating "...all the spaces between the words, and [restoring] the Bible to the original form...the way Moses received the Bible from God - contiguous, without break of words" he is able to decipher the code using a computer program that he wrote.

In a gripping personal testimony of his search for the truth, Drosnin awakes us to the possibility that our future is already written. But if it is already prophesied, can we change our future? Drosnin's mission is to warn us that the End of Days is upon us, and that the Bible code tells us that it will be in 2006. Only if we find the key to unlock the message that was hidden from us can we hope to change our destiny.

Two important concepts are presented in the book, first that world events we are witnessing are actually The End of Days as prophesied in the Bible; and second, that man's capacity for language was a gift to mankind from (God) the Lord of the code, and that our language gene came from an advanced race not of this Earth.

"The secret of the genetic code is revealed in Genesis, where God tells Abraham, 'I will bless thee greatly, and I will greatly multiply thy seed as the stars of Heaven, and as the sand that is upon the seashore; and in thy seed shall all the nations of the world be blessed."

That our DNA contains a gene that was sent to Earth in a vehicle from the cosmos, from an advanced race of men, is revealed in the code of the Torah and this theory is not new. About 25 years ago, Nobel laureate biologist Francis Crick published a theory called the Directed Panspermia.

This was a breath-taking read, and I highly recommend this book. Drosnin is objective and honest, and I like that.

Cindy DeJager is a writer and book reviewer for Rosetta Stone Press, publisher of The Many Waters, by Lauretta Lueck. www.RosettaStonePress.com">http://www.RosettaStonePress.com


MORE RESOURCES:
In what has become an annual rite under the Trump administration, the president's fiscal year 2020 budget proposal calls for the elimination of the National Endowment for the Arts. Trump's initial budgets for both fiscal 2018 and 2019 also called for cutting the NEA, but each time the House restored funds for the organization and last year gave the NEA a $3 million increase.

According to researchers, the English language might never have enjoyed a richness of F-words had it not been for early farmers and the food processing they favored. Dairy products and other soft foods, such as gruel, porridge, soup and stews, helped shape our faces, the researchers claim, and allowed us to form the sounds "f" and "v", known as labiodental fricatives...

After skipping 2018's announcement due to scandal, the Nobel Foundation has announced that the Nobel Prize in Literature will be awarded in 2019 - and that Laureates will be announced for both 2018 and 2019.

According to the press release: "During the past year, the Nobel Foundation has had a close dialogue with the Swedish Academy about the problems that arose in late 2017 and early 2018. Several important changes have been implemented since then. The Academy's regulations have been amended, making it possible for members to resign. The statutes have been clarified. Several new members have been elected. The Academy also no longer includes any members who are subject to conflict of interest or criminal investigations."

The longlist for The Women's Prize for Fiction 2019 have been announced. The winner will be declared in June.

The Silence of the Girls by Pat Barker
Remembered by Yvonne Battle-Felton
My Sister, the Serial Killer Oyinkan Braithwaite
The Pisces Melissa Broder
Milkman Anna Burns
Freshwater Akwaeke Emezi
Ordinary People Diana Evans
Swan Song Kelleigh Greenberg-Jephcott
An American Marriage Tayari Jones
Number One Chinese Restaurant Lillian Li
Bottled Goods Sophie van Llewyn
Lost Children Archive Valeria Luiselli
Praise Song for the Butterflies Bernice L. McFadden
Circe Madeline Miller
Ghost Wall Sarah Moss
Normal People by Sally Rooney

Across America, small theaters are canceling productions of Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird," citing a threat of litigation from a powerful, sharp-elbowed Broadway producer related to a contract that dates back half a century.

The theaters were planning to stage an adaptation of the novel by the playwright Christopher Sergel, which has been widely staged by adults and students for decades. Lawyers for the producer Scott Rudin, backed by the Lee estate, are telling the theaters that their productions are no longer permissible because there is a new adaptation, by the screenwriter Aaron Sorkin, which opened on Broadway in December...

The Guardian has a fun article on Susan Rennie's book, Roald Dahl's Rotsome and Repulsant Words, which is worth a read for all Dahl fans, and particularly lovers of his 1982 classic, The BFG:

If a small child were to walk up to the lexicographer Susan Rennie in the street and call her a slopgroggled grobsquiffler, she would know exactly how to reply. "You squinky squiddler!" she would shout. "You piffling little swishfiggler! You troggy little twit! Don't you dare talk pigsquiffle to me, you prunty old pogswizzler!" ...

Silicon Valley billionaire, philanthropist and author Michael Moritz and his wife Harriet Heyman's charitable foundation has been announced as the new sponsor of the Booker prize, a month after the Man Group revealed it was ending its 18-year sponsorship of the prestigious award for literary fiction.

Moritz and Heyman's foundation, Crankstart, has committed to an initial five-year exclusive funding term for the Booker, with an option to renew for a further five years. It will not give its name to the award, which will revert to its old name of the Booker prize from 1 June, when the Man Group's sponsorship ends.

We are pleased to announce the publication of The Inner Lives of Book Clubs!

This fascinating report is the first to really get to the heart of the book club experience. It's the result of two surveys of more than 5,500 people, combined with BookBrowse's more than 15 years of book club experience and research.

Its 56-pages are packed with interesting and usable information that is relevant to librarians, authors, publishers, booksellers and, of course, book clubs.

Among much else, you will discover:

  • The attributes most successful book groups share.
  • The demographics of public book clubs compared to private groups.
  • What people want from their book club.
  • The elements book clubs look for when picking books.
  • The 12 most common book club challenges, and how groups resolve them.
  • The link between discussion length and happiness.
  • The percentage of book clubs that use library book bags.
  • What people interested in a book club but not in one want from a group
  • What causes people to leave book clubs.

Prolific author William E. Butterworth III, who wrote under the name W.E.B. Griffin, has died aged 89.

The writer Andrea Levy, who explored the experience of Jamaican British people in a series of novels over 20 years has died, aged 62, from cancer.

After starting to write as a hobby in her early 30s, Levy published three novels in the 1990s that brought her positive reviews and steady sales. But her fourth novel, Small Island, launched her into the literary big league, winning the 2004 Orange prize, the Whitbread book of the year and the Commonwealth Writers' prize, selling more than 1m copies around the world and inspiring a 2009 BBC adaptation.

thatware.org ©