The Bible Code II: The Countdown, by Michael Drosnin

Sir Isaac Newton knew about the Bible code 300 hundred years ago when he described it as "a cryptogram set by the Almighty?.The riddle of the God-head, the riddle of past and future events divinely fore-ordained."

Newton was captivated with the idea that the Torah could contain a code that could foretell future events, but until the invention of the computer the task of deciphering this code was almost impossible. But "The Bible code had a time-lock. It could not be opened until the computer was invented?The Bible code is like a giant jigsaw puzzle, and we have only a handful of the pieces."

Journalist and reporter formerly for the Washington Post, Michael Drosnin, and Dr. Eliyahu Rips, a famous Israeli mathematician, explain their search for the Code Key that will decipher the Bible code. Like the Rosetta stone found at the mouth of the Nile 200 years ago, perhaps the code key would unlock the language of all mankind. Rips describes the structure of the Torah as a three-dimensional cylinder that "you just lay flat like a map" to read it, and "by eliminating "...all the spaces between the words, and [restoring] the Bible to the original form...the way Moses received the Bible from God - contiguous, without break of words" he is able to decipher the code using a computer program that he wrote.

In a gripping personal testimony of his search for the truth, Drosnin awakes us to the possibility that our future is already written. But if it is already prophesied, can we change our future? Drosnin's mission is to warn us that the End of Days is upon us, and that the Bible code tells us that it will be in 2006. Only if we find the key to unlock the message that was hidden from us can we hope to change our destiny.

Two important concepts are presented in the book, first that world events we are witnessing are actually The End of Days as prophesied in the Bible; and second, that man's capacity for language was a gift to mankind from (God) the Lord of the code, and that our language gene came from an advanced race not of this Earth.

"The secret of the genetic code is revealed in Genesis, where God tells Abraham, 'I will bless thee greatly, and I will greatly multiply thy seed as the stars of Heaven, and as the sand that is upon the seashore; and in thy seed shall all the nations of the world be blessed."

That our DNA contains a gene that was sent to Earth in a vehicle from the cosmos, from an advanced race of men, is revealed in the code of the Torah and this theory is not new. About 25 years ago, Nobel laureate biologist Francis Crick published a theory called the Directed Panspermia.

This was a breath-taking read, and I highly recommend this book. Drosnin is objective and honest, and I like that.

Cindy DeJager is a writer and book reviewer for Rosetta Stone Press, publisher of The Many Waters, by Lauretta Lueck.">

John Oliver's parody book about Vice President Mike Pence's family pet has sold out. The "Last Week Tonight" host appeared on "Ellen" on Tuesday to talk about his new children's book, "Last Week Tonight with John Oliver Presents a Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo." The book, which Oliver is using to troll Pence, coincides with the Pence family's release of their own children's book about the family pet rabbit, Marlon Bundo.

The American Library Association is facing significant financial challenges. The Trump administration wants to gut federal support for libraries. And librarians are fighting over whether its next executive director should be required to have a MLS degree...

The National Book Critics Circle announced the winners of its 2017 awards tonight:

Poetry: Layli Long Soldier, Whereas (Graywolf)

Criticism: Carina Chocano, You Play The Girl: On Playboy Bunnies, Stepford Wives, Trainwrecks, & Other Mixed Messages (Mariner)

Autobiography: Xiaolu Guo, Nine Continents: A Memoir In and Out of China (Grove)

Biography: Caroline Fraser, Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder (Metropolitan Books)

Nonfiction: Frances FitzGerald, The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America (Simon & Schuster)

Fiction: Joan Silber, Improvement (Counterpoint)

The John Leonard Prize: Carmen Maria Machado, Her Body and Other Parties (Graywolf)

The Nona Balakian Citation for Excellence in Reviewing: Charles Finch

The Ivan Sandrof Lifetime Achievement Award: John McPhee

About three-quarters (74%) of Americans have read a book in the past 12 months in any format, a figure that has remained largely unchanged since 2012, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted in January. Print books remain the most popular format for reading, with 67% of Americans having read a print book in the past year.

And while shares of print and e-book readers are similar to those from a survey conducted in 2016, there has been a modest but statistically significant increase in the share of Americans who read audiobooks, from 14% to 18%.

Overall, Americans read an average (mean) of 12 books per year, while the typical (median) American has read four books in the past 12 months. Each of these figures is largely unchanged since 2011, when the Center first began conducting the surveys of Americans' book reading habits.

Netflix will begin streaming the movie adaptation of The Guernsey Literary & Potato Peel Pie Society in North America, Latin America, Italy, Eastern Europe and Southeast Asia on April 20. Studiocanal will release the film in the U.K. on the same day, followed by Australia, New Zealand, France and Germany.

Accused by at least 10 women of sexual harassment, author Sherman Alexie has decided not to accept the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction that he won for You Don't Have to Say You Love Me: A Memoir (Little, Brown). His publisher has also delayed the release of the paperback edition.

The Guardian reports on the quandary facing romance authors--in the wake of #MeToo and Time's Up, how 'bad' should the bad boy be?

Introducing what will be an ongoing project, The New York Times writes, "Since 1851, obituaries in the New York Times have been dominated by white men. Now we're adding the stories of 15 remarkable women."

The obituaries published today include Sylvia Plath, Charlotte Bronte and Qui Jin (a feminist poet and revolutionary who became a martyr known as China's 'Joan of Arc.')

Reese Witherspoon and Kerry Washington will star in and executive produce the TV series Little Fires Everywhere, based on Celeste Ng's book.

Three women have gone on the record with NPR's All Things Considered--and at least seven others have spoken off the record with the show--about author Sherman Alexie's abusive treatment of them, confirming the anonymous and somewhat vague allegations that have been made recently online. ©