Moon Child - Review


Moon Child by Simone Maroney is a larger sized adventure, fantasy novel with 55 chapters. The story line involves complex relationships between six main characters, which are delicately balanced leaving room for intrigue.

Hanna, the chief character, was selected from birth by the Goddess, given special training and endowed with 'gifts' the elders call the 'Memories'. As Hanna goes through many travelling adventures, she becomes respected and known as the 'One' a 'Reader' and a 'Healer'.

Her father, a priest and a shaman in the village tries to protect her while making Hanna learn to stand on her own. Manon, a dear friend and fellow 'Healer', helps Hanna find a position in the same village that tried to kill her. Raer, her childhood friend, whose brain was inadvertently injured during play, becomes a valuable aid to Hanna and her adopted village. Janna, Hanna's archenemy, keeps people at attention with her evil and treacherous behavior. A little romance is thrown in with Jio, also known as 'Maih', who is actually Janna's brother.

So much is going on in the book that readers may find themselves stopping to retrace a few pages. I enjoyed reading this novel and found that it reminded me a little of Clan of the Cave Bear - because of the tribal differences, traveling and 'gifts' the chief character endures. Sometimes being selected by the Gods brings a tumultuous life!"

ISBN#: 1933157046
Author: Simone Maroney
Publisher: Draumr Publishing

~ Lillian Brummet - Book Reviewer - Co-author of the book Trash Talk, a guide for anyone concerned about his or her impact on the environment ­ Author of Towards Understanding, a collection of poetry.
www.sunshinecable.com/~drumit" target="_new">http://www.sunshinecable.com/~drumit


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