Russ Whitney: Journey To Greatness


Teenage years for Russ Whitney were not filled with opportunity, stability and financial security. He, as a teenager, was described as youth with no future prospects.

He, at this age, did indeed look to embody a guy that was 'going nowhere'. He had dropped out of high school and although was street smart didn't exude much of a potential for achievement. With no education, no qualifications, no ambition, he didn't justify being taken seriously.

He changed all of that and his job was what gave him the confidence and motivation to change his life.

Russ Whitney and early adulthood

After he dropped out of school he needed to find gainful employment.

It was the Tobin Meat Packing Factory in Albany, New York that gave him the job described as the starting block to a life filled with successes.

His job was nothing remarkable; he was a meat packer and earned an hourly wage. He earned $5 an hour packing meat for Tobin's.

A wife and child to support at the age of twenty and his meager wage meant that he struggled to stay afloat financially. His financial concerns and uninspiring job led him to seek alternative employment options.

He began to look at the various options available to make extra money. All the wealth creating schemes that he attempted he argued were either "pure junk" or, as he says, "Required a lot of money to start".

A good book gave him an idea to develop a business plan that didn't require great start-up capital. He realized that the real estate investment market was a viable means to create wealth and, three weeks after ordering the book, had made $11,000.

Russ Whitney in the money

In order to make his first money, he

? Purchased residential houses in ill repair ? Repaired the houses ? Generated a positive cash flow while he increased their value

He also increased his own net worth by implementing a variety of creative techniques.

He moved his family to Cape Coral when he turned twenty-five. In Florida, he borrowed the amount of $1,000 in order to effectively restructure his strategies. He then went on to create a fortune to the tune of $4.7 million. At this point, he never had to worry about money for the rest of his life.

Russ Whitney the millionaire

Upon making his first million, he wrote first book entitled, "Overcoming the Hurdles and Pitfalls of Real Estate Investing".

With this book, he hopes to tell people exactly what he did to amass his wealth whether it was the right or wrong move. He intends to let people know how they can also achieve financial success but without making the errors that he made.

Russ Whitney's incredible achievement

Russ Whitney started off with nothing; he was a high school dropout with no prospects. He decided that he wasn't going to accept his fate and be a poor and unsuccessful man all his life, and aimed his standards higher.

With determination hard work and a will to succeed, he reached and surpassed his high standards.

He is the example of a man who doesn't wait for opportunity but goes out and creates his own. With his advice you can follow his lead and create an opportunity of your own.

This isn't a selfish millionaire. Russ Whitney wants to share his secrets to wealth with you he wants you to experience all the freedom and security of financial independence.

Keywords: Russ Whitney, Real Estate Investing, Real Estate, John T. Reed, Building Wealth

Charles Light
Speaker - Author- Investor
cwmbooks@aol.com


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