Health Is Internal Beauty


Excerpted from the book "Your Right to Be Beautiful: How to Halt the Train of Aging and Meet the Most Beautiful You" by Tonya Zavasta. The book is available at: http://www.beautifulonraw.com

Jean Kerr, American author and playwright wrote: "I'm tired of all this nonsense about beauty being only skin-deep. That's deep enough. What do you want an adorable pancreas?"-

Jean Kerr was closer to the truth than she might have realized. Every outside organ of the human body is eligible to be called beautiful, but because internal organs are ordinarily seen only by surgeons, they get excluded from the beauty contest. If our internal organs were observed, we would describe them in terms of attractiveness, and normal color and shape would be considered beautiful. You need only compare pictures of normal healthy internal organs with pictures of their infected and diseased counterparts in the medical books to convince yourself that health and beauty are synonymous.

A healthy colon looks like evenly braided muscles. On the other hand, unhealthy colons are deformed: twisted and looped in some parts, ballooned and engorged in others, as revealed by barium X-rays. Visit a colon therapist, if only to observe the pictures of unhealthy colons and see for yourself how ugly one can be on the inside.

The blood of a healthy person is also beautiful. The red blood cells are uniformly round. The blood of a body full of toxins is contaminated with pathological bacteria, abnormal proteins, and parasites. When red blood corpuscles clump together, the condition is called Rouleau or "sticky" blood. Rouleau, this clumpy, unattractive blood, appears 5 to 20 years before symptoms of illness present themselves. It is an early messenger of hundreds of degenerative diseases. Conglomerates of red blood cells cannot access the fine capillaries of the body. Rouleau is particularly damaging to the organs of the head, in particular the eyes, ears, and scalp. A diet high in meat and dairy products increases the stickiness of your platelets. Blood that becomes sticky is a sure precursor of blood clots, strokes, and heart attacks.

The arterial pipelines in a healthy circulatory system are clean and clear from obstructions. In healthy arteries, the inner lining, called the intima, is smooth, supple, and without cracks. A cross-section of a normal coronary artery shows no arterial thickening or blood-blocking plaque deposits.

An unhealthy circulatory system paints an entirely different picture. The middle muscular layer of the artery can no longer fully recoil after a pulse wave has expanded the vessel. Elasticity of the artery walls is reduced, and cracks and hollows appear. They catch calcium, cholesterol deposits, fat accumulations, and clusters of platelets. Cholesterol deposits roughen the inner surfaces and damage the walls of the arteries. At first, plaque build-up does not cause discomfort--it is just ugly. But later, thick, clogged bloodstream results in coronary arteries becoming occluded with fatty buildup, which effects circulation and causes deterioration of the connective tissues. Deterioration and abnormal hardening of the arteries result in a process called arteriosclerosis and may cause heart disease, stroke, and hypertension.

The body often displays real ingenuity faced with substances it cannot metabolize or eliminate. It breaks them down and distributes them to remote areas of the body away from vital organs to minimize harm. The body takes the poisons out-of-the-way but not necessarily out of sight. The toxic wastes are pushed towards the peripheral organs, which happen to be the skin and every other organ that we can see on the outside.

External deformities are direct manifestations of internal pathologies. Ugly ropes of varicose veins, puffy faces, and cellulite are telling tales about your inside condition. Every pimple, psoriasis, or pigment change on your skin is in fact a reflection of some organ struggling to do its job. Every bulge, boil, or swelling is a sign that the body is pushing out some toxins in its effort to protect itself.

The term "natural beauty" has been misused and abused beyond restoration. Because there is no natural beauty without 100% natural food, the beauty that will emerge on the raw food diet I call Rawsome Beauty. Our external beauty is at its best when our internal organs are in the best possible shape, form, and color. Beautiful is not something extra the body needs: to be beautiful both inside and out is the natural state of one's body.

The vitality of internal organs, working properly, transcends your skin and brings a radiance to your face. This is when beauty does penetrate the skin. So when we admire sparkling eyes, fabulous skin, and lustrous hair, in a way we are admiring the teamwork of a healthy liver, colon, kidneys, etc. How profound the direct meaning of the phrase "beauty comes from within" really is.

Health and beauty are considered to be chronological losses. In my books I will convince you they don't have to be. It is biologically possible to look beautiful at any age. I intend to prove that beauty is not an accident; beauty is your birthright, it can be yours through the right daily choices, food you put in your mouth being the most important one. You can dramatically improve your appearance and do it 100 percent on your own without expensive products, plastic surgery or costly cosmetics.

"This article may be freely reprinted as long as the entire article and byline are included."

In her eye-opening first book, Your Right to Be Beautiful, author Tonya Zavasta shared the natural way she helped herself become noticeably more attractive. How? With the raw food lifestyle. Now with her new book, Beautiful on Raw, Tonya responds to the two questions most often raised by her enthusiastic readers: "Can you tell us about other women who achieved the same remarkable results? and "Where can we find recipes to help us make the this transition?" In Beautiful On Raw, you will read about the experiences of Tonya and 10 other women, ages 35 to 65. The stories of their astonishing results with the raw food with inspire you, and help you see that you can do it too!

For more information on how to reveal your Rawsome beauty visit her web-site at: www.beautifulonraw.com">http://www.beautifulonraw.com

Write to: BR Publishing, PO Box 623, Cordova, TN 38088-0623, USA or Call 866-STAY-RAW


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