Nice Girls Don't Get the Corner Office 101 - A Book Summary


Dr. Frankel clearly identifies the common mistakes -101 in all-that women commit unconsciously to sabotage their careers. This book provides revolutionary guides to help the women of today eliminate the girl-like behaviors they became accustomed with, which hold them back professionally.

How You Play the Game

Unfortunately, women are not as trained to participate in competitive sports. It is only recently that women started making their marks in this field. Thus, most women do not know the rules of the game of business. They simply do not know how to play it-and more importantly, how to win it.

Some of the common mistakes women commit as they play the game of business are: pretending it isn't a game; playing the game safely and within bounds; working hard; doing the what you want; avoiding office politics; being the conscience; protecting jerks; holding your tongue; failing to capitalize on relationships; and, not understanding the needs of your constituents.

How You Act

Being successful in the world of business is not only dependent on your knowledge of how to play it. It is also important to know how to act, professionally. Dr. Frankel enumerates some unlikely behaviors in the workplace that can be hard career busters.

These are: polling before making a decision; needing to be liked; not needing to be liked; not asking questions for fear of sounding stupid; acting like a man; telling the whole truth and nothing but the truth (so help you God); sharing too much personal information; being overly concerned with offending others; denying the importance of money; flirting; acquiescing to bullies; decorating your office like your living room; feeding others; offering a limp handshake; being financially insecure; and, helping.

How You Think

Changing the way you think can greatly impact a change in your career. Note the beliefs and thought patterns you learn early in girlhood that you need to reconsider and then eventually forget.

Some of these are: making miracles; taking full responsibility; obediently following instructions; viewing men in authority as father figures; limiting your possibilities; ignoring the quid pro quo (something that's exchanged in return for something else); skipping meetings; putting work ahead of your personal life; letting people waste your time; prematurely abandoning your career goals; ignoring the importance of network relationships; refusing perks; making up negative stories; and, striving for perfection.

How You Brand and Market Yourself

Marketing oneself is as important as marketing a specific brand. Think of yourself as a brand that's needs to be marketed effectively. Alongside these come some important points that women need to particularly remember.

The following are some mistakes to avoid in marketing yourself: falling to define your brand; minimizing your work or position; using only your nickname or first name; waiting to be noticed; refusing high-profile assignments; being modest; staying in you safety zone; giving away your ideas; working in stereotypical roles or departments; ignoring feedback; and, being invisible;

How You Sound

Put special attention to your choice words, tone of voice, speed of speech and thought organization process. These usually matter more than the content of your speech. An articulately delivered speech will help you be branded as knowledgeable, confident and competent. Remember, how you sound comprises 90% of your credibility.

Take note of these common mistakes: couching statements as questions; using preambles; explaining; asking permission; apologizing; using minimizing words; using qualifiers; not answering the question; talking too fast; the inability to speak the language of your business; using nonwords; using touchy-feely language; sandwich-effect; speaking softly; speaking at a higher-than-natural pitch; trailing voice mails; failing to pause or reflect before responding.

How You Look

There is this common notion that "the best and the brightest are rewarded with promotions and choice assignments." This is entirely wrong. Those who are competent enough, sound and look good are the ones who

move forward in their careers. Statistically, research shows that 55% of your credibility comes from how you look; 38% from how you sound; and, only 7% from what you actually say.

Carry yourself properly by avoiding these mistakes: smiling inappropriately; taking up too little space; using gestures inconsistent with your message; being over- or underanimated; tilting your head; wearing inappropriate makeup; wearing the wrong hairstyle; dressing inappropriately; sitting on your foot; grooming in public; sitting in meetings with your hands under the table; wearing your reading glasses around your neck; accessorizing too much; and, failing to maintain eye contact;

How You Respond

It is important to know how to respond to the ways others treat you. And some of the common pitfalls women do as a response to a certain gesture are as follows:

Internalizing messages; believing others know more than you; taking notes, getting coffee, and making copies; tolerating inappropriate behavior; exhibiting too much patience; accepting dead-end assignments; putting the needs of others before your own; denying your power; allowing yourself to be the scapegoat; accepting fait accompli (irreversible or predetermined decisions); permitting others' mistakes to inconvenience you; being the last to speak; playing the gender card; tolerating sexual harassment; and, crying.

By: Regine P. Azurin and Yvette Pantilla Regine Azurin is the President of BusinessSummaries.com, a company that provides business book summaries of the latest bestsellers for busy executives and entrepreneurs.

www.bizsum.com">http://www.bizsum.com "A Lot Of Great Books....Too Little Time To Read" Free Book Summaries Of Latest Bestsellers for Busy Executives and Entrepreneurs

Mailto: mailto:freearticle@bizsum.com
BusinessSummaries is a BusinessSummaries.com service.

(c) Copyright 2001- 2005, BusinessSummaries.com - Wisdom In A Nutshell


MORE RESOURCES:
Denis Johnson, the award-winning fiction writer, poet, and playwright whose best-known and most influential work, the story collection Jesus' Son, turned 25 this year, has died. He was 67. The cause of his death has not been disclosed.

Jean Fritz, an award-winning writer whose work helped transform historical biographies for children from leaden recitals of battles and dates into warm, human narratives full of quirks and crotchets and satisfyingly strange facts, died on Sunday at her home in Sleepy Hollow, N.Y. She was 101.

The author of more than four dozen books, Mrs. Fritz was known in particular for her biographies of many of the signal figures of 18th- and 19th-century American history.

America's libraries got a major boost this week on Capitol Hill as a group of leading publishing, information, software, and other businesses unveiled an organized effort to advocate for federal library funding. The move comes in response to the Trump administration's proposal to eliminate virtually all federal library funding, and the agency that distributes those funds to all 50 states.

Margarita Engle has been named the Young People's Poet Laureate by the Poetry Foundation. Awarded every two years, the $25,000 laureate title is given to a living writer in recognition of a career devoted to writing exceptional poetry for young readers. The laureate advises the Poetry Foundation on matters relating to young people's literature.

Suite Française, adapted from the bestselling book by Irene Nemirovsky will premiere on the Lifetime network May 22.

Represented by the Pacific Legal Foundation, Book Passage--with stores in Corte Madera, Sausalito and San Francisco, Calif.--and co-owner Bill Petrocelli have filed suit against a state law that, the plaintiffs say, "will make it extremely risky, if not impossible, for stores to sell autographed books or host author events."

Petrocelli said that the law's "expensive mandates--with voluminous reporting requirements and draconian penalties--create a nightmare for independent booksellers that thrive on author events and book signings. Consumers will also suffer. The tradition of author events at bookstores, with opportunities for direct interaction between writers and readers, will be shattered. The cost of record-keeping and major liability threaten to make book signings impossible, and stores such as mine do not want to engage in the massive intrusion on customer privacy that is mandated by the law's reporting rules."

Several publishers and authors organizations have officially joined the many book world people criticizing Amazon's new policy allowing third-party booksellers to "bid" for the primary spot in buy buttons.

A statement from the Authors Guild called the move "deeply disturbing" and said it "has the potential to decimate authors' and publishers' earnings from many books, especially backlist books." It noted, too, that the policy might be connected with Amazon's desire to force publishers to use its print-on-demand services, if POD availability will essentially guarantee a top spot on buy buttons. Such an arrangement, the Guild wrote, "looks an awful lot like a 'tying' arrangement under the antitrust law."

The statement concluded: "Amazon has already done enough damage in the book industry. It has devalued books by setting the price and consumer expectations for e-books and hard copy books artificially low, even taking a loss to do so. And it extracts an unreasonable fee from the sale of any book through its site, as compared to the services it provides, and charges extra for things it calls 'marketing services,' such as making a book discoverable on its site. Amazon gets away with this because it has monopoly and monopsony power over the retail book industry. Without a fair and open publishing marketplace, publishers will soon lose the ability to invest in the books that advance our knowledge and culture."

A new program from Amazon is drawing a range of reactions from those across the publishing industry, from fear to downright anger. The e-tailer has started allowing third-party book re-sellers to "win" buy buttons on book pages. The program, publishers, agents, and authors allege, is discouraging customers from buying new books, negatively affecting sales and revenue.

Once every 10 years Granta issues a special issue focused on new American fiction, "showcasing the young novelists deemed to be the best of their generation--writers of remarkable achievement and promise, still in their twenties and thirties."

It's Best of Young American Novelists of 2017 list includes "21 outstanding writers who capture the preoccupations of modern America." The authors are: Jesse Ball, Halle Butler, Emma Cline, Joshua Cohen, Mark Doten, Jen George, Rachel B Glaser, Lauren Groff, Yaa Gyasi, Garth Risk Hallberg, Greg Jackson, Sana Krasikov, Catherine Lacey, Ben Lerner, Karan Mahajan, Anthony Marra, Dinaw Mengestu, Ottessa Moshfegh, Chinelo Okparanta, Esmé Weijun Wang, and Claire Vaye Watkins.

Robert M. Pirsig, author of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values, died yesterday at age 88.

First published in 1974 by William Morrow, the book was a spectacularly popular philosophy book that was loosely autobiographical, tracing a father-son motorcycle trip and flashbacks to a period in which the author was diagnosed as schizophrenic. Its thesis was that quality is the basis of reality, and that this understanding unifies most East Asian and Western thought. Pirsig called this system of thought the Metaphysics of Quality.

thatware.org ©