Business Plans

Way back in business school we had to churn out business plans every semester. As soon as the assignment would drop we would be scrambling for information. Start the number crunching game, do the analysis, do some mental planning, and write business plans.

Then we graduated and got jobs. But, we still have to write business plans.

I came across a collection called">Business Plans from 'Business-planning-4-you' a few weeks ago. The title caught my eye as I wondered who would be giving away business plans and how many? How would they manage the number of industries? I wanted to find out more.

- It seems that they have over 1500 readymade business plans in their database.

- Covers a wide range of industries: from Abattoir Business Plan to Zen Practitioner Business Plan.

- The cost is $50 as of this writing. That makes it 3 cents per business plan (50/1500 = 0.03).

- They offer about 24 extra bonuses

I know I would be happy with the business plan templates that I could modify and add my own thoughts. I think it would be like instant soup. You have bought the basic ingredient, but you still need to provide a little bit more like hot water and a bowl.

Though I haven't tried the collection myself it looks quite good. I think this would be useful if you are in business school, early part of your career, or even a seasoned business man venturing into new areas.

Till next week and all the best with your business planning!

Sanjib Ahmad is a Product Consultant for"> - Business Best Sellers. You are free to use this article in its entirety as long as you leave all links in place, do not modify the content, and include the resource box listed above.

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