Cut to the Chase

The Review Diaries
"If It Doesn't Go Up, Don't Buy It!
By Albert W. Thomas
She Unlimited Magazine
Review by
Veronica Marie Kettler

"Cut to the Chase"

"Cut to the Chase" is exactly what Al Thomas sets forth to do is his book. The book is aimed for the basic investor with a simple straightforward lingo that a layman can understand.

Al Thomas does this book with candor and a detailed array of resources in the back of the book. No holds bared, Al reveals the truth about the Mutual Fund industry. ROI say it louder please "ROI" return on investment. "It is your money and no one has more interest in it than you do" Al Thomas. This is not one of those get rich quick books but your own personal hand held financial advisor.

His book is a revitalizing guise at investing. Even for newbie's out there, a newbie investor can grasp what he is saying. Leave all of that mumbo jumbo of Wall Street aside and the narrow minded, and take a deep breath of "In Your Face" guide to investing.

Some call it "Risky" to sell if it does not go up, but for better terms we will call it aggressive investments. The guess work is gone and this book is by far a clear and concise guide to the market, investments and your ROI. It is done with candor, clarity and poise.

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The National Book Critics Circle announced the winners of its 2017 awards tonight:

Poetry: Layli Long Soldier, Whereas (Graywolf)

Criticism: Carina Chocano, You Play The Girl: On Playboy Bunnies, Stepford Wives, Trainwrecks, & Other Mixed Messages (Mariner)

Autobiography: Xiaolu Guo, Nine Continents: A Memoir In and Out of China (Grove)

Biography: Caroline Fraser, Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder (Metropolitan Books)

Nonfiction: Frances FitzGerald, The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America (Simon & Schuster)

Fiction: Joan Silber, Improvement (Counterpoint)

The John Leonard Prize: Carmen Maria Machado, Her Body and Other Parties (Graywolf)

The Nona Balakian Citation for Excellence in Reviewing: Charles Finch

The Ivan Sandrof Lifetime Achievement Award: John McPhee

About three-quarters (74%) of Americans have read a book in the past 12 months in any format, a figure that has remained largely unchanged since 2012, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted in January. Print books remain the most popular format for reading, with 67% of Americans having read a print book in the past year.

And while shares of print and e-book readers are similar to those from a survey conducted in 2016, there has been a modest but statistically significant increase in the share of Americans who read audiobooks, from 14% to 18%.

Overall, Americans read an average (mean) of 12 books per year, while the typical (median) American has read four books in the past 12 months. Each of these figures is largely unchanged since 2011, when the Center first began conducting the surveys of Americans' book reading habits.

Netflix will begin streaming the movie adaptation of The Guernsey Literary & Potato Peel Pie Society in North America, Latin America, Italy, Eastern Europe and Southeast Asia on April 20. Studiocanal will release the film in the U.K. on the same day, followed by Australia, New Zealand, France and Germany.

Accused by at least 10 women of sexual harassment, author Sherman Alexie has decided not to accept the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction that he won for You Don't Have to Say You Love Me: A Memoir (Little, Brown). His publisher has also delayed the release of the paperback edition.

The Guardian reports on the quandary facing romance authors--in the wake of #MeToo and Time's Up, how 'bad' should the bad boy be?

Introducing what will be an ongoing project, The New York Times writes, "Since 1851, obituaries in the New York Times have been dominated by white men. Now we're adding the stories of 15 remarkable women."

The obituaries published today include Sylvia Plath, Charlotte Bronte and Qui Jin (a feminist poet and revolutionary who became a martyr known as China's 'Joan of Arc.')

Reese Witherspoon and Kerry Washington will star in and executive produce the TV series Little Fires Everywhere, based on Celeste Ng's book.

Three women have gone on the record with NPR's All Things Considered--and at least seven others have spoken off the record with the show--about author Sherman Alexie's abusive treatment of them, confirming the anonymous and somewhat vague allegations that have been made recently online.

New York Times critics chose 15 remarkable books by women that are shaping the way we read and write fiction in the 21st century...

Although many movies based on books were nominated for Oscars this year, only three won with a total of five awards between them:

Darkest Hour, based on the book Darkest Hour: How Churchill Brought England Back from the Brink by Anthony McCarten: Two wins: Best Actor (Gary Oldman) and Best Makeup & Hairstyling.

Call Me by Your Name, adapted from André Aciman's novel: Best Writing Adapted Screenplay (James Ivory).

Blade Runner 2049, based on characters from the novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick: Two wins: Best Cinematography & Best Visual Effects. ©