Reality Checked - Book Review


Reality Checked - Life through Death, is a moving saga about finding meaning in a world of suffering and pointless hate based on the color of skin. Former school teacher and Theologist, Victor Waller has incorporated many of life's issues through the lives of his characters who were forced to make decisions in hopeless situations. Racism, revenge and hate are rampant in this book. Domestic abuse and the dangers hidden within our society's foster care system are also addressed.

There is only one main character - Catherine Brown - along with a host of supporting characters. Catherine grows up under the terrible threat of racism - which many use simply as an excuse to harm another human. In fact, her father and uncle were orphaned at a very young age through a racist attack. The fairy-tale romance of her parents slid away as fears of her father's suspected infidelity enforces her mother's accusations that she is being poisoned. Never really knowing the truth, Catherine stumbles through her youth and into adulthood.

Unfortunately, a disturbed individual brutally murders her family and Catherine is dragged away by the police and incarcerated for many years. She survived the harsh environment through the friendship of her cellmate - and their hunger for revenge.

As an old woman, Catherine is only free from the bars of her prison. Her body is now her jailer - it is discovered that she inherited her mother's mysterious illness. Thinking she had no family remaining alive, Catherine is surprised when she is invited to a family reunion. This reunion proves to be one of Catherine's greatest challenges. As she seeks to repair the family discord, she is contacted by a person from the past and her chance for revenge is handed to her on a silver platter.

Victor Waller has created an important and meaningful story in Reality Checked. In fact, the work is well titled. The novel provokes the reader to question their own choices in life - and possibly, to release some of the pessimistic inner voices which influence their decisions.

I give this 377 page novel the highest of ratings with no hesitation, what-so-ever.

ISBN#: 0976498103
Author: Victor Waller
Publisher: Turn Key Press

~ Lillian Brummet - Book Reviewer - Co-author of the book Trash Talk, a guide for anyone concerned about his or her impact on the environment ­ Author of Towards Understanding, a collection of poetry.
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