The Seventh Jewel - Book Review

The Seventh Jewel is a fantasy-adventure fiction geared for youth (ages 11 and up). J.J. Pritchard crammed several tantalizing elements in only 278 pages. The reader is taken on a journey that involves a treasure hunt, a noble quest and the discovery of an ancient civilization. The author touches upon family relationships, dealing with death and coming to terms with loosing a limb. The Seventh Jewel is also an educational book that brings up serious issues from poverty to discrimination. Mr. Pritchard's approach to encourage readers to use his glossary of the ancient Inca language was very well done.

J.J. Pritchard, author of 6 books including The Seventh Jewel, has participated in a climbing expedition in Peru. His first hand knowledge of Peru, global warming and ancient Inca history is shown by tasteful and accurate use of facts. He couples this with highly plausible events throughout the story, making this book very well rounded, unique and realistic.

There are four main characters: Emma, a gutsy and witty teenage amputee, teaches the reader understanding and respect for what amputees experience. I think she could be a role model for many readers. Joel, her brave 11-year-old brother, displays a loyal adventurous heart. Uncle Jake, a well-connected treasure hunter by trade, plays the part of a hero and protector during a few points in the story. Estrella, a beautiful professor, has a chip on her shoulder that begins to melt when she meets Uncle Jake. Her life long dream is to honor her people by discovering the mysterious jewel of the Ancient Inca.

They are all thrown together when scientists discover that knowledge of an extremely rare element may exist in the ancient records of the Inca. This element has the potential to combat global warming and it is worth an inconceivable amount of money. Because of this value, people of questionable character are attracted to treasure hunt - but they play by their own rules and answer to their own ethics.

The Seventh Jewel was an exceptional read. I highly encourage readers to pick up a copy of J.J. Pritchard's latest book. You won't be disappointed!

ISBN#: 0595336744
Author: J. J. Pritchard
Publisher: iUniverse

~ Lillian Brummet - Book Reviewer - Co-author of the book Trash Talk, a guide for anyone concerned about his or her impact on the environment ­ Author of Towards Understanding, a collection of poetry." target="_new">

The National Book Critics Circle announced the winners of its 2017 awards tonight:

Poetry: Layli Long Soldier, Whereas (Graywolf)

Criticism: Carina Chocano, You Play The Girl: On Playboy Bunnies, Stepford Wives, Trainwrecks, & Other Mixed Messages (Mariner)

Autobiography: Xiaolu Guo, Nine Continents: A Memoir In and Out of China (Grove)

Biography: Caroline Fraser, Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder (Metropolitan Books)

Nonfiction: Frances FitzGerald, The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America (Simon & Schuster)

Fiction: Joan Silber, Improvement (Counterpoint)

The John Leonard Prize: Carmen Maria Machado, Her Body and Other Parties (Graywolf)

The Nona Balakian Citation for Excellence in Reviewing: Charles Finch

The Ivan Sandrof Lifetime Achievement Award: John McPhee

About three-quarters (74%) of Americans have read a book in the past 12 months in any format, a figure that has remained largely unchanged since 2012, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted in January. Print books remain the most popular format for reading, with 67% of Americans having read a print book in the past year.

And while shares of print and e-book readers are similar to those from a survey conducted in 2016, there has been a modest but statistically significant increase in the share of Americans who read audiobooks, from 14% to 18%.

Overall, Americans read an average (mean) of 12 books per year, while the typical (median) American has read four books in the past 12 months. Each of these figures is largely unchanged since 2011, when the Center first began conducting the surveys of Americans' book reading habits.

Netflix will begin streaming the movie adaptation of The Guernsey Literary & Potato Peel Pie Society in North America, Latin America, Italy, Eastern Europe and Southeast Asia on April 20. Studiocanal will release the film in the U.K. on the same day, followed by Australia, New Zealand, France and Germany.

Accused by at least 10 women of sexual harassment, author Sherman Alexie has decided not to accept the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction that he won for You Don't Have to Say You Love Me: A Memoir (Little, Brown). His publisher has also delayed the release of the paperback edition.

The Guardian reports on the quandary facing romance authors--in the wake of #MeToo and Time's Up, how 'bad' should the bad boy be?

Introducing what will be an ongoing project, The New York Times writes, "Since 1851, obituaries in the New York Times have been dominated by white men. Now we're adding the stories of 15 remarkable women."

The obituaries published today include Sylvia Plath, Charlotte Bronte and Qui Jin (a feminist poet and revolutionary who became a martyr known as China's 'Joan of Arc.')

Reese Witherspoon and Kerry Washington will star in and executive produce the TV series Little Fires Everywhere, based on Celeste Ng's book.

Three women have gone on the record with NPR's All Things Considered--and at least seven others have spoken off the record with the show--about author Sherman Alexie's abusive treatment of them, confirming the anonymous and somewhat vague allegations that have been made recently online.

New York Times critics chose 15 remarkable books by women that are shaping the way we read and write fiction in the 21st century...

Although many movies based on books were nominated for Oscars this year, only three won with a total of five awards between them:

Darkest Hour, based on the book Darkest Hour: How Churchill Brought England Back from the Brink by Anthony McCarten: Two wins: Best Actor (Gary Oldman) and Best Makeup & Hairstyling.

Call Me by Your Name, adapted from André Aciman's novel: Best Writing Adapted Screenplay (James Ivory).

Blade Runner 2049, based on characters from the novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick: Two wins: Best Cinematography & Best Visual Effects. ©