Star - Book Review


Tom Peters crafted a moving, educational animal adventure story in his novel Star. This is a dog-lover's fiction - written for a young adult audience. Any young person who loves animals, or wants to own a dog should read this book.

Without preaching, Tom enlightens humans to the plight of dogs. He brings understanding to how they see things and why they behave the way they do. The most moving moral to the story for me was shown through the main character (a dog named Star) whose owners had school, work, play and friends - while Star has only them. It really puts their world into perspective. I was torn and sorrowed by the incidents in the kennel and animal shelter. If I have not been donating enough to these shelters before, I will most certainly endeavor do so now.

Star is a courageous, loving lab-rottweiler cross who goes through many adventures from being 'rescued' from a puppy mill, abandoned in a forest, being stolen by a trucker and used by jewelry thieves. Star ensures a place in the readers heart through his self-less rescue of a little boy and his generous, loving heart.

I do not think a reader could put down this book without being moved by the great heart that Star displayed repeatedly. There are many lessons here for young adults from the dangers in the world, to the plight of pets and the strength of love.

ISBN#: 1553521927
Author: Tom Peters
Publisher: Tree Side Press.

~ Lillian Brummet - Book Reviewer - Co-author of the book Trash Talk, a guide for anyone concerned about his or her impact on the environment ­ Author of Towards Understanding, a collection of poetry.
www.sunshinecable.com/~drumit" target="_new">http://www.sunshinecable.com/~drumit


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