Second Eden Book Review


"Carlton Austin has crafted a wonderful piece of work in Second Eden - an action-packed suspense thriller with a little romance and some elements of science fiction. Its beautifully designed cover incorporates gorgeous images depicting scenes within the plot and the book is available in both hard and soft cover. I recommend the hard cover, folks. This book is sure to be one that you keep among your favorite authors on your bookshelves. Second Eden is destined for a talented director to take big screen fans on its roller-coaster ride.

Best of friends, Peter (an intelligence agent) and Bo (an astronaut), have a bond that even Peter's affair with Bo's wife could not break. Bo and some other scientists perish in a mysterious fire just after completing an assignment. The government cover-up pushes Peter to find out what really happened and he becomes torn between patriotism and humanitarianism. He never loved a woman until he met Molly - but can he trust her? In fact, he wonders if he can trust anyone at all.

This is definitely an intelligent read; the author incorporates incredible alien artifacts, mysteries, murders, government espionage and complex cover-ups, cat and mouse chase scenes, archeological finds and ancient societies, deceit and a love story that transcends this life into the next.

Second Eden certainly has a plot that will make its readers think deeply about our world. Carlton shows us the dangers of where our science could lead. His story teaches that there are repercussions for every single choice that we make - both as individuals and as a society. He brings up social issues, like reminding us of the importance of recognizing the value of women who choose to be mothers - as a career, rather than as a side project. He even includes enlightening views of what might happen to a soul when the body can no longer serve it.

I really cannot say enough about Carlton's novel. Truly, I could barely put it down to go to work or prepare meals! Second Eden will remain on my bookshelf for years to come and will, no doubt, be read many times by my family."

ISBN#: 0595316530 - soft cover 0595663567 - hard cover Publisher: iuniverse, Inc. Author: Carlton Austin

~ Lillian Brummet - Book Reviewer - Co-author of the book Trash Talk, a guide for anyone concerned about his or her impact on the environment Author of Towards Understanding, a collection of poetry.
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