Ferns Dragon - Book Review


"Fern's Dragon is a wonderfully fun read that stimulates the imagination of both young people and the young-at-heart alike. It is a good mystery-fantasy story that is artfully composed.

Fern is a bright, artistic young girl who is utterly fascinated with dragons. One day she created a masterpiece with beach sand and loved it so much that she was reluctant to leave her dragon, Nogard. When her mother brought Fern to visit Norgard, they were shocked to discover he was missing. Later that night, Fern is visited by Norgard, who begs for her help in saving dragon-kind.

Little Fern finds herself leading the last of the race of dragons, following clues and trying to piece together a way to save the dragon king - the only dragon with the power to stop the catastrophe about to fall.

David Wills has done a superb job on this children's book. His use of colors and visually stimulating words is sure to spark the imagination. The light ending will leave a smile on the readers' face.

I highly recommend this book to parents, as they are unlikely to become bored with their children begging to have the story repeatedly read to them. I know I certainly enjoyed it."

ISBN# 1413770177

Publisher: Publish America, Inc

Author: David Wills

~ Lillian Brummet - Book Reviewer - Co-author of the book Trash Talk, a guide for anyone concerned about his or her impact on the environment ­ Author of Towards Understanding, a collection of poetry.
www.sunshinecable.com/~drumit" target="_new">http://www.sunshinecable.com/~drumit


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