Dark Autumn - Book Review

"Now this could definitely be a movie! Dark Autumn is fantastic action-packed futuristic thriller that had me riveted for days. The energy was kept very high throughout the book.

Occasionally Clint Dunshee's characters performed seemingly super-human tasks, similar to James Bond or Dirk Pitt. However, the reader is also shown their flaws and the strength of intimate friendships - bonds that are so deep they are willing to risk their lives for them. The abilities of these characters are made more believable because of the incredibly difficult training scenarios the author leads the reader through.

The theme is set in the future when space travel and space science is a part of life. Earth is contacted from another planet when one of the science probes is picked up by alien humans. As it turns out Earth is only one of hundreds of planets with intelligent life, only some were human. Many planets in the universe helped bring Earth's technology up to par in exchange for the planet's rich agriculture and minerals. Most planets worked on a good trade relation in relative peace, but the trouble-making Marvonians were on the edge of acceptance. This planet took it upon themselves to steal from Earth and attack their ships within a few light years of Marvon.

The main characters of the book, Alan, Bill, Carrie, Julie and Angela are all highly intelligent youth that are singled out for highly trained positions. Despite their youth and inexperience, they were considered Earth's only chance to avoid a war with a technologically superior race. Bounty hunters and sabotage plays a part in a deadly scavenger hunt while plans are laid to rescue the hostages held by Marvonians. Earth has a chance to destroy their image of being a young planet and elevate into more sophisticated, honorable one that the other planets can respect and hold trade with more readily.

In order to do this, Earth must play the game carefully and honorably - at the same time the team must eliminate the dangerous problems with Marvon and free the Earthling prisoners before it is too late.

I believe this book deserves the highest ratings and I would recommend it to anyone, anytime, anywhere."

Publisher: Publish America, Inc.
ISBN#: 1413750923
Author: Clint Dunshee

~ Lillian Brummet - Book Reviewer - Co-author of the book Trash Talk, a guide for anyone concerned about his or her impact on the environment Author of Towards Understanding, a collection of poetry.
www.sunshinecable.com/~drumit" target="_new">http://www.sunshinecable.com/~drumit

John Oliver's parody book about Vice President Mike Pence's family pet has sold out. The "Last Week Tonight" host appeared on "Ellen" on Tuesday to talk about his new children's book, "Last Week Tonight with John Oliver Presents a Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo." The book, which Oliver is using to troll Pence, coincides with the Pence family's release of their own children's book about the family pet rabbit, Marlon Bundo.

The American Library Association is facing significant financial challenges. The Trump administration wants to gut federal support for libraries. And librarians are fighting over whether its next executive director should be required to have a MLS degree...

The National Book Critics Circle announced the winners of its 2017 awards tonight:

Poetry: Layli Long Soldier, Whereas (Graywolf)

Criticism: Carina Chocano, You Play The Girl: On Playboy Bunnies, Stepford Wives, Trainwrecks, & Other Mixed Messages (Mariner)

Autobiography: Xiaolu Guo, Nine Continents: A Memoir In and Out of China (Grove)

Biography: Caroline Fraser, Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder (Metropolitan Books)

Nonfiction: Frances FitzGerald, The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America (Simon & Schuster)

Fiction: Joan Silber, Improvement (Counterpoint)

The John Leonard Prize: Carmen Maria Machado, Her Body and Other Parties (Graywolf)

The Nona Balakian Citation for Excellence in Reviewing: Charles Finch

The Ivan Sandrof Lifetime Achievement Award: John McPhee

About three-quarters (74%) of Americans have read a book in the past 12 months in any format, a figure that has remained largely unchanged since 2012, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted in January. Print books remain the most popular format for reading, with 67% of Americans having read a print book in the past year.

And while shares of print and e-book readers are similar to those from a survey conducted in 2016, there has been a modest but statistically significant increase in the share of Americans who read audiobooks, from 14% to 18%.

Overall, Americans read an average (mean) of 12 books per year, while the typical (median) American has read four books in the past 12 months. Each of these figures is largely unchanged since 2011, when the Center first began conducting the surveys of Americans' book reading habits.

Netflix will begin streaming the movie adaptation of The Guernsey Literary & Potato Peel Pie Society in North America, Latin America, Italy, Eastern Europe and Southeast Asia on April 20. Studiocanal will release the film in the U.K. on the same day, followed by Australia, New Zealand, France and Germany.

Accused by at least 10 women of sexual harassment, author Sherman Alexie has decided not to accept the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction that he won for You Don't Have to Say You Love Me: A Memoir (Little, Brown). His publisher has also delayed the release of the paperback edition.

The Guardian reports on the quandary facing romance authors--in the wake of #MeToo and Time's Up, how 'bad' should the bad boy be?

Introducing what will be an ongoing project, The New York Times writes, "Since 1851, obituaries in the New York Times have been dominated by white men. Now we're adding the stories of 15 remarkable women."

The obituaries published today include Sylvia Plath, Charlotte Bronte and Qui Jin (a feminist poet and revolutionary who became a martyr known as China's 'Joan of Arc.')

Reese Witherspoon and Kerry Washington will star in and executive produce the TV series Little Fires Everywhere, based on Celeste Ng's book.

Three women have gone on the record with NPR's All Things Considered--and at least seven others have spoken off the record with the show--about author Sherman Alexie's abusive treatment of them, confirming the anonymous and somewhat vague allegations that have been made recently online.

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