Book Summary: Networking For Professional Success


Book Summary:


This article is based on the following book:
www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0749415975/qid=1028374811/sr=1-20/cgicity" target="_new">Effective Networking for Professional Success: "How to Make the Most of Your Personal Contacts"
by Rupert Hart, Stirling Books, 1997
ISBN 0 949 142 09 3
125 pages

We are all "self-employed" now.

Today there is absolutely no job security. We are living in an age of corporate downsizing, and freelance consultants, or self-employed workers are growing by the day. Networking is one skill you need to practice to get ahead and survive these uncertain times.

Wisdom in a Nutshell:

  • Networking is essential for both new jobs and business contracts.

  • Effective networking is 12 times more effective than answering advertisements

  • Advertising is becoming ineffective except on a large scale.

  • Networking helps you find hidden opportunities and can set you apart from the competition.

  • An indirect approach is better than a direct one. Use someone you know to introduce you to your target contact. Never go straight to your target without a go-between who will put in a good word for you.

  • You can overcome your natural shyness, your fear of using people, and your fear of rejection.

    The 3 key networking techniques are:

  • Build a network of partners to keep an open eye and ear for new opportunities for You.

  • Reach targeted individuals in two ways: directly or indirectly.

  • Build visibility by raising your profile. Go to every social gathering you possibly can.

    Building your network is an ongoing process. You need to increase your range of contacts constantly.

    Planning your campaign:

  • Define your objective

  • Select the right technique

  • Understand that "deal flow" or your number of prospects must be great in order to bag one new business contract.

  • Identify your target

  • Work out your positioning. This is a short statement of what you are about, what you can offer.

  • Think about what you can do for your network partners in exchange for information and contacts.

    Building Network partners:

  • Talk to everyone you know about opportunities

  • Clarify what network partners can and will do for you

  • Know which contacts to build into network partners

  • Find those friendly network spiders, those types of people who just seem to know everyone.

  • Use the telephone.

    How to grow and refresh your network:

  • Go out of your way to be where people are.

  • Get into the habit of being talkative.

  • Get the contact details of people you meet. Not just exchanging business cards but stapling information like birthdays, anniversaries, hobby clubs, and key information onto their cards.

  • Choose the right method for the right person.

  • Warm up long-cold contacts.

    How to find targeted individuals:

  • Focus on what you want to achieve and how people can help you.

  • Use your network partners to find suitable companies.

  • Gather key information on these companies.

  • Figure out who is the one with the power to hire you.

  • Find people connections and common areas of interest.

    Reaching targets through network partners:

  • Find and persuade the best partner for your targeted individual.

  • Engineer an introduction.

  • Build word-of-mouth exchanges about yourself.

    Reaching targets directly:

  • Decide if you should write a letter or not.

  • Be able to demonstrate your achievements.

  • Have a line ready to get you past the secretary.

  • Act as though you expect to be put through.

  • Be ready to leave a short, persuasive message for the decision-maker.

    Your opening line:

  • Be cheerful, confident and straightforward.

  • Exploit connections and recommendations.

  • Mention common interests.

  • Report news of interest to the target.

  • Wait for a response. Know when to shut up.

  • Write down your opening lines before picking up the phone.

    How to be visible without really trying:

  • Ask a question at a conference.

  • Make a point in a meeting.

  • Write letters to your industry magazine.

  • Introduce yourself to lots of people at an industry show or ball.

  • Buy people a drink at the bar at a lecture.

  • Discuss a book with an industry leader.

  • Wear bright ties.

  • Make people laugh.

  • Have an opinion on everything. (But keep an open mind)

  • Hand out an unusual business card.

  • Recast your CV to be a little different.

  • Take up an unusual hobby. (But not too unusual)

  • Don't overlook using the email and Internet to communicate your cause.

    About The Author

    By: Regine P. Azurin and Yvette Pantilla

    www.bizsum.com/freearticle2.htm" target="_new">http://www.bizsum.com/freearticle2.htm

    "A Lot Of Great Books....Too Little Time To Read"

    Free Book Summaries Of Latest Bestsellers for Busy Executives and Entrepreneurs

    Mailto:freearticle@bizsum.com

    BusinessSummaries is a BusinessSummaries.com service.

    (c) Copyright 2001-2002, BusinessSummaries.com - Wisdom In A Nutshell


    MORE RESOURCES:
    According to Barnes & Noble's survey, 77% of Americans read at least one book, newspaper or magazine during Thanksgiving or other holiday travel, while 60% of travelers usually bring, buy or borrow reading material specifically for travel on Thanksgiving Eve. Some 73% of respondents said they felt that traveling on the day before Thanksgiving is a "good time to bring a book they would enjoy and be able to read," and just over a quarter of Americans feel that "bringing a book along for Thanksgiving could give them a way to get out of an uncomfortable or awkward conversation with a relative or other guest."

    Anuk Arudpragasam has won the prestigious ?DSC Prize for South Asian Literature 2017 for his novel, "?The Story of a Brief Marriage", published by Granta in the UK, and by Flatiron in the USA

    Arudpragasam was awarded the $25,000 (£18,830) prize along with a unique trophy by Hon'ble Abul Maal Abdul Muhith, minister of finance of Bangladesh ?at the Dhaka Literature Festival in Bangladesh.

    Little House on the Prairie Fans will likely enjoy Publishers Weekly's article, "10 Things You Probably Didn't Know about Laura Ingalls Wilder."

    The national book awards for 2017 have been announced.
    The winners are:
    Fiction: Jesmyn Ward, Sing, Unburied, Sing
    Nonfiction: Masha Gessen, The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia
    Poetry: Frank Bidart, Half-light: Collected Poems 1965-2016
    Young People's Literature: Robin Benway, Far from the Tree

    Annie Proulx received the Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.

    Indies First/Small Business Saturday 2017 and the start of the holiday shopping season are just a week and a half away (Nov 25), and more independent bookstores around the United States are finalizing their plans for the annual celebration of bookselling and small businesses. Shelf Awareness rounds up some of the planned activities...

    Bookstore sales declined 6.5% this September, compared to September 2016, according to preliminary figures released by the U.S. Census Bureau Wednesday morning. Sales in September were $1.01 billion, down from $1.8 billion a year ago.

    The Observer newspaper continues its 2+ year project to review what it deems to be the top 100 nonfiction books of all time. The series began in February 2016 with their No. 1 pick, Elizabeth Kolbert's The Sixth Extinction and is on track to complete by the turn of the year. The most recent review is for The Diary of Samuel Pepys coming in at No. 92.

    The Observer is the sister newspaper to the better known British newspaper, The Guardian. The Observer publishes on Sundays, The Guardian publishes on all other days of the week. Both newspapers combine their content into theguardian.com website.

    With 4 million or 17% of all online ebooks being pirated, novelists including Maggie Stiefvater and Samantha Shannon say theft by fans puts their books at risk.

    The playwright Tom Stoppard has won the David Cohen prize for a lifetime's achievement in literature, hailed as a "giant of 20th-century British drama" with an "outstanding and enduring body of unfailingly creative, innovative and brilliant work."

    Howard Jacobson in the Guardian asks how many of us still read a book in bed?

  • thatware.org ©