The New Art of War, Tactics, and Power


To rise and flourish in the world, you need to act according to how things really are, and you need to be a good strategist and manager. Most of the tactical information in the world lacks much practical value. However, over the years there have been a few texts written that are infamous for their no holds barred practical content. This includes classics such as Sun Tzu's The Art of War, Niccolo Machiavelli's The Prince, Baltasar Gracian's The Art of World Wisdom, and the works of Han Fei Tzu.

Now author Rodney Ohebsion has taken key ideas and selections from these four texts, made some new variations, additions and condensations, and put everything in a new organization--resulting in a concise "new classic" titled the New Art of War, Tactics, and Power.

Here are some insights from the book:

Overvaluing minor advantages will impede major advantages.

It is dangerous for a ruler to trust others. Anyone who trusts others can be manipulated by others.

A Sage-Ruler institutes a policy where the people have no way to do him wrong, and cannot avoid doing him good. He never relies on them doing him good only by love. It is dangerous to rely on the people doing him good with love. It is safe to rely on their not being able to avoid doing him good.

Most people will submit to authority; very few will be moved by righteousness. ... It is very uncommon to see reverence for benevolence and loyalty to righteousness, and it is rather difficult for one to act thus. ... People will by nature submit to authority. Anyone who seizes authority can easily make people submit.

Do not repeat the exact same tactics just because they have gained you one victory--instead, let your methods be regulated by the infinite variety of circumstances.

Take advantage of any inclinations in mood your enemy has. If he gets frustrated easily, frustrate him. If he is taking it easy, get him in a panic. ... Attack where he is unprepared, and appear where you are not expected.

The clever combatant looks to the effect of combined energy, and does not require too much from individuals; hence his ability to pick out the right men and utilize combined energy. He uses each person according to his capacity, and does not expect each person to be fit for everything.

The wise prince does whatever he can to exercise those things that are inside of his control, and uses what is in his control to be prepared for variations outside of his control.

Live according to the moment--our acts and thoughts and all must be determined by circumstances. Act when you may, because time and tide wait for no one. Do not live by certain fixed rules, nor let your will pledge to fixed conditions, for you may have to drink the water tomorrow that you cast away today. There are some people so absurdly stubborn in error, that they expect all the circumstances of an action should bend to their own eccentric whims, and not vice versa.

If a ruler is constant in giving rewards, and does not grant pardons when giving punishments, and if he makes rewards honorable and punishments disgraceful, then everyone will try hard.

People who lack an understanding of government often preach that "Old methods should never be altered, and accepted customs should not be abandoned." A sage, however, is not decidedly for or against change. All he is interested in is the proper and effective way of ruling. His decision to alter old methods or abandon accepted customs is only based on the criteria of whether or not these old methods and customs are effective right now.

The wise ruler observes what people do, but avoids letting people observe his own motives.

Even if a ruler is excellent, he should not make assumptions about acts. He should intently observe and examine what motivates ministers' actions.

The New Art of War, Tactics, and Power is available for purchase at Amazon.com">http://Amazon.com and other internet book retailers.

Rodney Ohebsion is the author of non-fiction books. His official website is located at www.immediex.com/rodneyohebsion.html">http://www.immediex.com/rodneyohebsion.html


MORE RESOURCES:
According to Barnes & Noble's survey, 77% of Americans read at least one book, newspaper or magazine during Thanksgiving or other holiday travel, while 60% of travelers usually bring, buy or borrow reading material specifically for travel on Thanksgiving Eve. Some 73% of respondents said they felt that traveling on the day before Thanksgiving is a "good time to bring a book they would enjoy and be able to read," and just over a quarter of Americans feel that "bringing a book along for Thanksgiving could give them a way to get out of an uncomfortable or awkward conversation with a relative or other guest."

Anuk Arudpragasam has won the prestigious ?DSC Prize for South Asian Literature 2017 for his novel, "?The Story of a Brief Marriage", published by Granta in the UK, and by Flatiron in the USA

Arudpragasam was awarded the $25,000 (£18,830) prize along with a unique trophy by Hon'ble Abul Maal Abdul Muhith, minister of finance of Bangladesh ?at the Dhaka Literature Festival in Bangladesh.

Little House on the Prairie Fans will likely enjoy Publishers Weekly's article, "10 Things You Probably Didn't Know about Laura Ingalls Wilder."

The national book awards for 2017 have been announced.
The winners are:
Fiction: Jesmyn Ward, Sing, Unburied, Sing
Nonfiction: Masha Gessen, The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia
Poetry: Frank Bidart, Half-light: Collected Poems 1965-2016
Young People's Literature: Robin Benway, Far from the Tree

Annie Proulx received the Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.

Indies First/Small Business Saturday 2017 and the start of the holiday shopping season are just a week and a half away (Nov 25), and more independent bookstores around the United States are finalizing their plans for the annual celebration of bookselling and small businesses. Shelf Awareness rounds up some of the planned activities...

Bookstore sales declined 6.5% this September, compared to September 2016, according to preliminary figures released by the U.S. Census Bureau Wednesday morning. Sales in September were $1.01 billion, down from $1.8 billion a year ago.

The Observer newspaper continues its 2+ year project to review what it deems to be the top 100 nonfiction books of all time. The series began in February 2016 with their No. 1 pick, Elizabeth Kolbert's The Sixth Extinction and is on track to complete by the turn of the year. The most recent review is for The Diary of Samuel Pepys coming in at No. 92.

The Observer is the sister newspaper to the better known British newspaper, The Guardian. The Observer publishes on Sundays, The Guardian publishes on all other days of the week. Both newspapers combine their content into theguardian.com website.

With 4 million or 17% of all online ebooks being pirated, novelists including Maggie Stiefvater and Samantha Shannon say theft by fans puts their books at risk.

The playwright Tom Stoppard has won the David Cohen prize for a lifetime's achievement in literature, hailed as a "giant of 20th-century British drama" with an "outstanding and enduring body of unfailingly creative, innovative and brilliant work."

Howard Jacobson in the Guardian asks how many of us still read a book in bed?

thatware.org ©