Review: eBook Secrets Exposed


If you want to make a lot of money with your own eBookand you only read one book on the subject in the next12 months, I strongly recommend that it's 'eBookSecrets Exposed' by Jim Edwards and David Garfinkel.

The authors are both well qualified in this area. JimEdwards has written five best-selling eBooks(including 'The Lazy Man's Guide to Online Business' and'33 Days To Online Success').

David Garfinkel is considered by many to be theworld's greatest copyrighting coach. He's anaward-winning business journalist and is also theauthor of several best-selling eBooks, such as'Advertising Headlines That Make You Rich' and 'KillerCopy Tactics'.

There have been so many books on this subject that Ireally couldn't imagine how this book could addanything new.

But I have never before seen an eBook that explainsso clearly how to do it. I got the feeling that you couldliterally walk in Jim Edwards' footsteps and get thesame results he did (over 4,500 eBook sales in 9 months).

What makes this book very readable and enjoyable is thatit's simply a long interview - David Garfinkel asksthe questions and Jim Edwards gives the answers.

The book is packed with so many 'insider tips' that'sit's difficult to know where to begin, but one of themost valuable tips is how to find out - before youwrite your book - if there's a market for it.

You do this by following Jim Edwards' 5-Step 'UltimateeBook Success Formula'. The formula allows you to findout if there's a target audience that is alreadyactively looking for the information you're about tosell online. And if so, if they are prepared to payfor it.

One of the interesting things you'll discover in thisbook is that competition is actually good for youreBook.

If you come up with an idea for an eBook and you findthat there are no competing books, you need to getworried - it means there's probably no market for thatidea.

But if there are books competing with yours, you're onsafe ground - you know you have a market.

And don't be put off by competition: anyone who isserious about a particular subject will buy at least 4or 5 books on that topic.

Many eBook authors who make big money quickly withtheir eBooks do resale rights. Instead of making $29per sale, they're making $99 per sale. As you can see,resale rights can get you into serious money veryfast.

But there are definite pitfalls with resale rights(such as finding out a few months later that yourcherished information product has become a freeeBook). If you want to avoid these pitfalls, you needto read Section 2 carefully.

You might think that best-selling eBook authors don'tbother with affiliate programs. Wrong!

Jim Edwards shows you that one of secrets to makingmoney with your eBook is to load it up with back-endaffiliate links. But there's a right way to do this anda wrong way (more about this in Section 5).

But the real secret to how Jim Edwards made over$40,000 in one month from a single eBook is jointventures - finding people with lists of 10,000 or even100,000 and getting them to do a personalrecommendation to their readers.

On the Internet it's not products that make money,it's lists (products don't sell, lists do). Or as JimEdwards puts it: 'the power is in the pipes, in thedistribution'.

Let's say your eBook is priced at $29 and you findsomeone with a list of 10,000 and they do a mailingthat results in 3000 people turning up at yourwebsite.

And let's say that those 3000 visits result in 90 to 180sales - you and your joint venture partner are suddenlymaking thousands of dollars in a few days.

Jim Edwards shows you exactly, step-by-step, how toset up a joint venture. He even shows you the exactsame letter that he used to set up joint ventures forhis book 'How To Write and Publish Your Own eBook in alittle as 7 Days'.

One of the keys to making joint ventures work is whatJim Edwards calls 'the Santa Claus technique' (more onthat in Section 2).

A question many people have is how to price theireBook. And it's crucial that you get this right. InSection 4 Jim Edwards reveals his 'pricing formula' -a very clever way to find your eBook's 'breakpoint' orequilibrium.

There's another very valuable tip in Section 17 - 'MySecret Method For Slashing Refunds' (this tip on it'sown could be worth the price of the whole book).

This is the best book on eBook publishing I've read inthe last 18 months - in fact, while reading it, I cameup with the idea for my next eBook!

You can get your copy of 'eBook Secrets Exposed' at:http://www.freezineweb.com/ese.html

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Michael Southon has been writing for the Internet for over 3
years. He has shown hundreds of webmasters how to use this
simple technique to build a successful online business. Click
here to find out more: ezine-writer.com/">http://ezine-writer.com/
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