Review: Profit From The Author Inside You


I've reviewed a number of eBooks recently, and none of themexcited me, but this one definitely did. If you've ever hadthe slightest desire to write a 'How To' book, I urge youto read 'Profit From The Author Inside You'.

It's worth pointing out right at the start that RogerParker does know what he's talking about - he has written24 books that have been translated into 37 languages andthere are currently over 1.6 million copies of his books inprint.

This book assumes that you offer some kind of professionalservice. Roger Parker argues that writing a 'How To' bookis not an end in itself, but a means of positioningyourself as one of the leading experts in your field. AsRoger Parker shows, books possess "magical" powers -writing a book opens the doors to speaking engagements,spinoff books, newsletters, columns, and hefty consultingfees.

I once knew a human resources expert in Australia and hewas very good at what he did. But he used to complainbitterly that there were people with half his expertiseearning 20 times the amount he was. Why? Because they hadwritten a book!

If you've always thought of writing as a painful processthat requires a huge creative effort, you may be in for apleasant shock.

Roger Parker shows that most successful (i.e. top-selling)'How To' books are based on a formula - they are written ina 'paint by numbers' fashion.

The most exciting part of this book for me is a techniquethat Roger Parker calls 'Painless Writing'.

He urges you to throw out of the window two very common(and unsuccessful) approaches to writing a book: MarathonWriting ("Getting away from it all" and dropping all otheractivities while you work on your book) and Linear Writing(trying to write your book from first to last chapter in anordered sequence).

Instead, he offers three approaches that will change theway you write and make it much easier and much more fun:

(1) Molecular writing - this is a way of 'chunking down'to the level of bite-sized pieces of information:"harvesting individual ideas, or nuggets of information,which you carefully organize and prioritize beforebeginning writing".

(2) Measurable progress writing - "committing to write alittle each day, building time into your daily schedule (asopposed to escaping to a cabin in the woods)".

(3) Non-sequential writing - "jumping into your projectwherever you're comfortable, starting with the easiestideas, and building your confidence point by point, idea byidea, wherever they appear in your book".

Another part of this book that is essential reading ifyou're thinking of writing a book is Chapter Four - '10Characteristics of Successful Titles'. Did you know thatat least half of your book's success will be determined bythe title you choose?

Roger Parker shows you 10 key concepts that make thedifference between a title that sells well and one thatflops. (Here's a hint: the following titles all use these10 key concepts: Chicken Soup For The Soul; Rich Dad, PoorDad; The Millionaire Next Door; The 7 Habits of HighlyEffective People; Think and Grow Rich; How to Win Friendsand Influence People).

The book also contains 4 work sheets (pages 99 to 120) thatguide you through the writing of your book.

'Profit From The Author Inside You' set of explosions in myhead on virtually every page. In fact, it fired me up so muchthat I'm now using Roger Parker's techniques to write a bookthat I've been trying to write for over 5 years. What morecan I say?

You can get your copy of 'Profit From The Author Inside You'at: http://www.freezineweb.com/cgi-bin/pftaiy.cgi It has a 30day money back guarantee, so you really can't go wrong.

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Michael Southon has been writing for the Internet for over 3
years. He has shown hundreds of webmasters how to use this
simple technique to build a successful online business. Click
here to find out more: ezine-writer.com/">http://ezine-writer.com/
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