Review: Profit From The Author Inside You

I've reviewed a number of eBooks recently, and none of themexcited me, but this one definitely did. If you've ever hadthe slightest desire to write a 'How To' book, I urge youto read 'Profit From The Author Inside You'.

It's worth pointing out right at the start that RogerParker does know what he's talking about - he has written24 books that have been translated into 37 languages andthere are currently over 1.6 million copies of his books inprint.

This book assumes that you offer some kind of professionalservice. Roger Parker argues that writing a 'How To' bookis not an end in itself, but a means of positioningyourself as one of the leading experts in your field. AsRoger Parker shows, books possess "magical" powers -writing a book opens the doors to speaking engagements,spinoff books, newsletters, columns, and hefty consultingfees.

I once knew a human resources expert in Australia and hewas very good at what he did. But he used to complainbitterly that there were people with half his expertiseearning 20 times the amount he was. Why? Because they hadwritten a book!

If you've always thought of writing as a painful processthat requires a huge creative effort, you may be in for apleasant shock.

Roger Parker shows that most successful (i.e. top-selling)'How To' books are based on a formula - they are written ina 'paint by numbers' fashion.

The most exciting part of this book for me is a techniquethat Roger Parker calls 'Painless Writing'.

He urges you to throw out of the window two very common(and unsuccessful) approaches to writing a book: MarathonWriting ("Getting away from it all" and dropping all otheractivities while you work on your book) and Linear Writing(trying to write your book from first to last chapter in anordered sequence).

Instead, he offers three approaches that will change theway you write and make it much easier and much more fun:

(1) Molecular writing - this is a way of 'chunking down'to the level of bite-sized pieces of information:"harvesting individual ideas, or nuggets of information,which you carefully organize and prioritize beforebeginning writing".

(2) Measurable progress writing - "committing to write alittle each day, building time into your daily schedule (asopposed to escaping to a cabin in the woods)".

(3) Non-sequential writing - "jumping into your projectwherever you're comfortable, starting with the easiestideas, and building your confidence point by point, idea byidea, wherever they appear in your book".

Another part of this book that is essential reading ifyou're thinking of writing a book is Chapter Four - '10Characteristics of Successful Titles'. Did you know thatat least half of your book's success will be determined bythe title you choose?

Roger Parker shows you 10 key concepts that make thedifference between a title that sells well and one thatflops. (Here's a hint: the following titles all use these10 key concepts: Chicken Soup For The Soul; Rich Dad, PoorDad; The Millionaire Next Door; The 7 Habits of HighlyEffective People; Think and Grow Rich; How to Win Friendsand Influence People).

The book also contains 4 work sheets (pages 99 to 120) thatguide you through the writing of your book.

'Profit From The Author Inside You' set of explosions in myhead on virtually every page. In fact, it fired me up so muchthat I'm now using Roger Parker's techniques to write a bookthat I've been trying to write for over 5 years. What morecan I say?

You can get your copy of 'Profit From The Author Inside You'at: It has a 30day money back guarantee, so you really can't go wrong.

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The National Book Critics Circle announced the winners of its 2017 awards tonight:

Poetry: Layli Long Soldier, Whereas (Graywolf)

Criticism: Carina Chocano, You Play The Girl: On Playboy Bunnies, Stepford Wives, Trainwrecks, & Other Mixed Messages (Mariner)

Autobiography: Xiaolu Guo, Nine Continents: A Memoir In and Out of China (Grove)

Biography: Caroline Fraser, Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder (Metropolitan Books)

Nonfiction: Frances FitzGerald, The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America (Simon & Schuster)

Fiction: Joan Silber, Improvement (Counterpoint)

The John Leonard Prize: Carmen Maria Machado, Her Body and Other Parties (Graywolf)

The Nona Balakian Citation for Excellence in Reviewing: Charles Finch

The Ivan Sandrof Lifetime Achievement Award: John McPhee

About three-quarters (74%) of Americans have read a book in the past 12 months in any format, a figure that has remained largely unchanged since 2012, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted in January. Print books remain the most popular format for reading, with 67% of Americans having read a print book in the past year.

And while shares of print and e-book readers are similar to those from a survey conducted in 2016, there has been a modest but statistically significant increase in the share of Americans who read audiobooks, from 14% to 18%.

Overall, Americans read an average (mean) of 12 books per year, while the typical (median) American has read four books in the past 12 months. Each of these figures is largely unchanged since 2011, when the Center first began conducting the surveys of Americans' book reading habits.

Netflix will begin streaming the movie adaptation of The Guernsey Literary & Potato Peel Pie Society in North America, Latin America, Italy, Eastern Europe and Southeast Asia on April 20. Studiocanal will release the film in the U.K. on the same day, followed by Australia, New Zealand, France and Germany.

Accused by at least 10 women of sexual harassment, author Sherman Alexie has decided not to accept the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction that he won for You Don't Have to Say You Love Me: A Memoir (Little, Brown). His publisher has also delayed the release of the paperback edition.

The Guardian reports on the quandary facing romance authors--in the wake of #MeToo and Time's Up, how 'bad' should the bad boy be?

Introducing what will be an ongoing project, The New York Times writes, "Since 1851, obituaries in the New York Times have been dominated by white men. Now we're adding the stories of 15 remarkable women."

The obituaries published today include Sylvia Plath, Charlotte Bronte and Qui Jin (a feminist poet and revolutionary who became a martyr known as China's 'Joan of Arc.')

Reese Witherspoon and Kerry Washington will star in and executive produce the TV series Little Fires Everywhere, based on Celeste Ng's book.

Three women have gone on the record with NPR's All Things Considered--and at least seven others have spoken off the record with the show--about author Sherman Alexie's abusive treatment of them, confirming the anonymous and somewhat vague allegations that have been made recently online.

New York Times critics chose 15 remarkable books by women that are shaping the way we read and write fiction in the 21st century...

Although many movies based on books were nominated for Oscars this year, only three won with a total of five awards between them:

Darkest Hour, based on the book Darkest Hour: How Churchill Brought England Back from the Brink by Anthony McCarten: Two wins: Best Actor (Gary Oldman) and Best Makeup & Hairstyling.

Call Me by Your Name, adapted from André Aciman's novel: Best Writing Adapted Screenplay (James Ivory).

Blade Runner 2049, based on characters from the novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick: Two wins: Best Cinematography & Best Visual Effects. ©