Humor Just Got A Whole Lot Funnier With Juggin Joe


Author Joseph Yakel presents his own blend of humor and melodrama in this country boy comedy. Offered as a light-hearted, fun adventure with a feel-good edge, Yakel said he was looking to amuse his audience with something a little different. "With Juggin Joe, I wanted to create a funny, but identifiable character, and his own unique 'hook', that would draw readers into his world. Hopefully, I've done that with this comedy adventure, and Joe and the rest of the gang will strike a good chord amongst readers."

Yakel describes "The Legend of Juggin Joe" as an over-the-top fictional humor story that takes place in and around the Town of Westerlo, NY, and centers around the life and times of a hillboy dubbed 'Juggin Joe', for his uncanny musical abilities with the jug. Yakel said, "This book is a country boy comedy/melodrama that I've written in 'country speak', which makes the story that much more fun to read. It's a light-hearted, clean, fun adventure, suitable for all audiences."

Have you ever watched a country movie, and, in a good natured way, tried to imitate the characters' accents and dialogue? Sure you have, and more than likely, you had yourself a good laugh with the trying. Now then, have you ever read a book with such a dialogue? Probably not, and further, you've likely never even seen such a book. Until now, that is. After you read 'The Legend of Juggin Joe', you'll be able to respond affirmatively that, not only have you satisfied your longing to fill this heretofore literary void, but that you had a hilariously good time in doing so! Once the rhythm of the dialogue takes root in your mind, you'll actually start thinking and talking like the characters! And that, my friends, is the key that unlocks your door to Joe's world!

As the story begins, you'll laugh at Joe's country ways, and, perhaps, perceive him and the rest of the gang, merely as 'bumpkins'. But, as the comedy-melodrama unfolds, you'll quickly realize that there is more below the surface of that Westerlo topsoil than you had initially suspected. As you wind your way through the chapters, your laughter will gradually shift from being aimed at Joe, and somehow become laughter shared with Joe! By the time you realize that this subtle transformation has occurred, the hook has already been set! All the while, the secrets to unlocking Joe's full potential in the world are slowly revealed.

It's easy to identify with Joe. You'll root him on, share his joy, and feel his pain, as he weathers the storms of life. By the time the book ends, you'll have gained a newfound respect and admiration for Joe, his good-natured antics, and for his unmistakably simple perspective of life. Simply put, Juggin Joe transforms those around him, and brings balance to the world - it's what he does.

If the grind of everyday life and work is putting you to sleep, worry your troubled heart no more. A remedy is now at hand. Good humor is a powerful antidote to the 'environmental lethargy' weighing you down. So, go ahead and read, "The Legend of Juggin Joe", and count yourself among those who have awaked!

"The Legend of Juggin Joe" * ISBN 1-4116-2588-9 * Pub date: March 2005 * $9.00 paperback * 123 pages *

About the Author:
Among his credits, Joseph Yakel has three books. He describes "The Legend of Juggin Joe" (March 2005) as a 'country boy comedy/melodrama' delivered with a writing style he dubs 'unconventional'. Joe categorizes his two other works as 'slightly more serious' genealogy books. The Autograph Memories of Mary Yakel (December 2004) is a 19th century memoir, and The JACKEL, JECKEL, JAECKEL, IEKEL, YAKEL Family History Book (March 2005) is a family chronology, tracing 350 years of his Rheinish ancestry. First published in 1998, Joe's articles have appeared in publications such as Communications Technology, The Pipeline, and Army Reserve Magazine.

His articles have also been highlighted on USAWOA Online, USAR Online, and other Internet websites. Previews of his books can be viewed at www.lulu.com/yakel">http://www.lulu.com/yakel


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