Chris Carpenters Google Cash - An Ebook Review


It is rare to find a brand new blueprint for making cash on the internet. The continuous churning of rehashed and ripped off regurgitated pablum has plagued the internet guru market for the last few years. But ever so often with some persistent digging you find a gem. Google Cash is that shining diamond on the coal-heap of get-rich-on-the-internet promotion.

With the pending IPO of Google and all the hype surrounding it, it's easy to overlook the hidden fundamentals that make Google such a marketing miracle. The Google Adwords program allows savvy marketers to reach highly desirable eyeballs at a predictable cost. Google Cash is a startlingly frank analysis of this fast-paced direct response medium.

You sell hand-made knitted scarves. You can place your ad directly in the path of people searching for one. With some elbow grease and a sharp pencil you can figure out to the penny what you can afford to pay for that ad. And you can target the world or Little Rock Arkansas with that ad thanks to the awesome interface and techno-wizardry of Google Adwords. What used to take 3 months in the "old days" of marketing back in the nineties takes 3 hours today!

Chris Carpenter lays out a step-by-step blueprint for generating extra income on the web using Google Adwords. He pulls back the curtain and reveals his own successful campaigns and even some of his stumbles in this marketing arena. He demystifies the mathematics and explains the entire process at a Grade 10 comprehension level.

If I had a teenage son or daughter, I would get them to stop working at McDonalds and get them investing their free time in building an online auction business. I used to hate cleaning the garage. Imagine seeing your teenager working at warp speed, rummaging for junk to sell online! It's possible thanks to Google Cash.

Can anything and everything be sold online through Google Adwords? Frankly, the astounding answer is yes! If a human wants it, you can put it in front of them. The Google Adwords interface is the single most powerful direct-response medium currently on the planet. With 300 million daily searches, with a little bit of imagination and creativity you can find a target niche for your product.

Think of Google Cash as a starting point rather than a be-all-end-all solution. For the price, it delivers great value. But you have to take action with this guide. Even though it lays out the step-by-step path to follow, you'll still have to invest the hours building your keyword campaigns and creating your Google projects. Even though there is real brain work involved, the potential rewards of developing your own online cash machine with Google outweighs the short term sweat equity. I think you'll enjoy Google Cash.

David Ledoux is an online entrepreneur, freelance writer and author. He is the creative force behind www.best-online-auction-links.com ">http://www.best-online-auction-links.com and www.free-palm-programs.com">http://www.free-palm-programs.com


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