Are You Using Both Sides of the GoogleCoin?


By now most of you realise that Google can give our websites the ability to appear within their results pages using a Pay Per Click model (PPC).

This is called Google Adwords

Hopefully, you will also be aware that that Google offers
website owners the ability to display these PPC results on
their own websites.

For this privilege, Google will pay the website owner a
share of the PPC revenue earnt from any click throughs on
the results displayed on their website.

This is called Google Adsense

So there you have both sides of the Google coin.

On one side, the ability to drive low cost targeted traffic
and on the other side, the ability to generate revenue from
your existing traffic.

You'd think that was the end of it but really it is only the
beginning.

Heads or Tails? Heads it is?.

Let's look at Adwords

There are those that think?

?write your ad, pays your money and away you go.

Which to 80% of the people using Adwords, this seems to work
OK for them. Remember I said OK!

For the other 20% , these guys and gals, are testing,
changing, innovating and working Google as hard as they can.

One such character is Chris Carpenter , whose GoogleCash is
pioneering in the way that he works Google and now lets
other work Google just as hard.

"Like Bruce Lee taught us the art of fighting without
fighting, Chris Carpenter shows us the art of website
revenue generation without a website!"

Chris has shown examples of Adwords campaigns that cost
cents to set up but pay dollars in commissions. None of my
current investments give me such a high ROI.

I have tried my hand at it and I am currently making around
$4000 per month just from this one product. I am only
spending $250 on Adwords to get this return.

Why not have a look at Google Cash yourself.

www.j2-squared.com/google-cash-book-review.htm">http://www.j2-squared.com/google-cash-book-review.htm

Tails you win!

Secondly, while most people just cut and paste Adsense code
into all the pages of their site, they just leave it at that
thinking job done!

They don't explore the high value keywords in their market
or niche.


Why do that?

Well if you knew what the more profitable keywords and terms
are, you can write content and these words can be displayed.
Google Adsense will then look at your page content and work
out what to display.

You could double your income by changing words on your site.
Maybe Life insurance to life assurance or personal loan to
loans or adverse credit to bad credit.

Also sites tend to use one format and one position for the
ads.

Test, test, test

Try different layouts and work out which ones work best for
you. You may be surprised.

Test, test, test

There are several tools that can help you identify keywords
but the best for you would be either the Google Adwords
program or Overture view bids tool.

Don't worry about thinking you are doing anything wrong. In
fact, think about it - you will be creating relevant content
for Google to display and for their users to read. Users are
happy, Google are happy and you will earn more revenue from
Adsense. So hopefully you'll be happy too!

A Win Win situation!

Again, like most things rather than reinvent the wheel there
is a whole book on Adsense written my friend William
Charlwood has written The Definitive Guide to Google AdSense
which tells you exactly how to make money by hosting small
ads on your website. It is a detailed road-map of everything
you need to do to get going and then maximise your AdSense
income.

Once you've got it right, you can look forward to a check
every month from Google.

Check this out here:

www.j2-squared.com/adsense-guide.htm">http://www.j2-squared.com/adsense-guide.htm

So there you are, there are two sides to the Google coin.
Are you using both sides!

Good Luck!

Jason Hulott is Director of J2 Squared, leading specialists in www.j2-squared.com">Internet consultancy whose specific aim is to drive more revenue to websites. Their main area of focus are the insurance, finance, and automotive industries.


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